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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Natural Language Processing is a subject that combines computer science and linguistics, aiming to provide computers with the ability to understand natural language and to develop a more intuitive human-computer interaction. The research community has developed ways to translate natural language to mathematical formalisms. It has not yet been shown, however, how to automatically translate different kinds of knowledge in English to distinct formal languages. Most of the recent work presents the problem that the translation method aims to a specific formal language or is hard to generalize. In this research, I take a first step to overcome this difficulty …

Contributors
Alvarez Gonzalez, Marcos, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2010

Action language C+ is a formalism for describing properties of actions, which is based on nonmonotonic causal logic. The definite fragment of C+ is implemented in the Causal Calculator (CCalc), which is based on the reduction of nonmonotonic causal logic to propositional logic. This thesis describes the language of CCalc in terms of answer set programming (ASP), based on the translation of nonmonotonic causal logic to formulas under the stable model semantics. I designed a standard library which describes the constructs of the input language of CCalc in terms of ASP, allowing a simple modular method to represent CCalc input …

Contributors
Casolary, Michael, Lee, Joohyung, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2011

Different logic-based knowledge representation formalisms have different limitations either with respect to expressivity or with respect to computational efficiency. First-order logic, which is the basis of Description Logics (DLs), is not suitable for defeasible reasoning due to its monotonic nature. The nonmonotonic formalisms that extend first-order logic, such as circumscription and default logic, are expressive but lack efficient implementations. The nonmonotonic formalisms that are based on the declarative logic programming approach, such as Answer Set Programming (ASP), have efficient implementations but are not expressive enough for representing and reasoning with open domains. This dissertation uses the first-order stable model semantics, …

Contributors
Palla, Ravi Kiran Reddy, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2012

Answer Set Programming (ASP) is one of the most prominent and successful knowledge representation paradigms. The success of ASP is due to its expressive non-monotonic modeling language and its efficient computational methods originating from building propositional satisfiability solvers. The wide adoption of ASP has motivated several extensions to its modeling language in order to enhance expressivity, such as incorporating aggregates and interfaces with ontologies. Also, in order to overcome the grounding bottleneck of computation in ASP, there are increasing interests in integrating ASP with other computing paradigms, such as Constraint Programming (CP) and Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT). Due to the …

Contributors
Meng, Yunsong, Lee, Joohyung, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2013

Reasoning about actions forms the basis of many tasks such as prediction, planning, and diagnosis in a dynamic domain. Within the reasoning about actions community, a broad class of languages, called action languages, has been developed together with a methodology for their use in representing and reasoning about dynamic domains. With a few notable exceptions, the focus of these efforts has largely centered around single-agent systems. Agents rarely operate in a vacuum however, and almost in parallel, substantial work has been done within the dynamic epistemic logic community towards understanding how the actions of an agent may effect not just …

Contributors
Gelfond, Gregory, Baral, Chitta, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2018

Knowledge Representation (KR) is one of the prominent approaches to Artificial Intelligence (AI) that is concerned with representing knowledge in a form that computer systems can utilize to solve complex problems. Answer Set Programming (ASP), based on the stable model semantics, is a widely-used KR framework that facilitates elegant and efficient representations for many problem domains that require complex reasoning. However, while ASP is effective on deterministic problem domains, it is not suitable for applications involving quantitative uncertainty, for example, those that require probabilistic reasoning. Furthermore, it is hard to utilize information that can be statistically induced from data with …

Contributors
Wang, Yi, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2019