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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Resource Type
  • Doctoral Dissertation
Date Range
2012 2018


Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However, most of the research in Question Answering aims at factual questions rather than deep ones such as ``How'' and ``Why'' questions. In this dissertation, I suggest a different approach in tackling this problem. We believe that the answers of deep questions need to be formally defined before found. Because these answers must be defined based on something, it is better …

Contributors
Vo, Nguyen Ha, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2015

As we migrate into an era of personalized medicine, understanding how bio-molecules interact with one another to form cellular systems is one of the key focus areas of systems biology. Several challenges such as the dynamic nature of cellular systems, uncertainty due to environmental influences, and the heterogeneity between individual patients render this a difficult task. In the last decade, several algorithms have been proposed to elucidate cellular systems from data, resulting in numerous data-driven hypotheses. However, due to the large number of variables involved in the process, many of which are unknown or not measurable, such computational approaches often …

Contributors
Ramesh, Archana, Kim, Seungchan, Langley, Patrick W, et al.
Created Date
2012

Image Understanding is a long-established discipline in computer vision, which encompasses a body of advanced image processing techniques, that are used to locate (“where”), characterize and recognize (“what”) objects, regions, and their attributes in the image. However, the notion of “understanding” (and the goal of artificial intelligent machines) goes beyond factual recall of the recognized components and includes reasoning and thinking beyond what can be seen (or perceived). Understanding is often evaluated by asking questions of increasing difficulty. Thus, the expected functionalities of an intelligent Image Understanding system can be expressed in terms of the functionalities that are required to …

Contributors
Aditya, Somak, Baral, Chitta, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2018

Automated planning problems classically involve finding a sequence of actions that transform an initial state to some state satisfying a conjunctive set of goals with no temporal constraints. But in many real-world problems, the best plan may involve satisfying only a subset of goals or missing defined goal deadlines. For example, this may be required when goals are logically conflicting, or when there are time or cost constraints such that achieving all goals on time may be too expensive. In this case, goals and deadlines must be declared as soft. I call these partial satisfaction planning (PSP) problems. In this …

Contributors
Benton, J., Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2012

Current work in planning assumes that user preferences and/or domain dynamics are completely specified in advance, and aims to search for a single solution plan to satisfy these. In many real world scenarios, however, providing a complete specification of user preferences and domain dynamics becomes a time-consuming and error-prone task. More often than not, a user may provide no knowledge or at best partial knowledge of her preferences with respect to a desired plan. Similarly, a domain writer may only be able to determine certain parts, not all, of the model of some actions in a domain. Such modeling issues …

Contributors
Nguyen, Tuan Anh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014

Reasoning about the activities of cyber threat actors is critical to defend against cyber attacks. However, this task is difficult for a variety of reasons. In simple terms, it is difficult to determine who the attacker is, what the desired goals are of the attacker, and how they will carry out their attacks. These three questions essentially entail understanding the attacker’s use of deception, the capabilities available, and the intent of launching the attack. These three issues are highly inter-related. If an adversary can hide their intent, they can better deceive a defender. If an adversary’s capabilities are not well …

Contributors
Nunes, Eric, Shakarian, Paulo, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2018

Reasoning about actions forms the basis of many tasks such as prediction, planning, and diagnosis in a dynamic domain. Within the reasoning about actions community, a broad class of languages, called action languages, has been developed together with a methodology for their use in representing and reasoning about dynamic domains. With a few notable exceptions, the focus of these efforts has largely centered around single-agent systems. Agents rarely operate in a vacuum however, and almost in parallel, substantial work has been done within the dynamic epistemic logic community towards understanding how the actions of an agent may effect not just …

Contributors
Gelfond, Gregory, Baral, Chitta, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2018

Biological organisms are made up of cells containing numerous interconnected biochemical processes. Diseases occur when normal functionality of these processes is disrupted, manifesting as disease symptoms. Thus, understanding these biochemical processes and their interrelationships is a primary task in biomedical research and a prerequisite for activities including diagnosing diseases and drug development. Scientists studying these interconnected processes have identified various pathways involved in drug metabolism, diseases, and signal transduction, etc. High-throughput technologies, new algorithms and speed improvements over the last decade have resulted in deeper knowledge about biological systems, leading to more refined pathways. Such pathways tend to be large …

Contributors
Anwar, Saadat, Baral, Chitta, Inoue, Katsumi, et al.
Created Date
2014