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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Language
  • English
Resource Type
  • Doctoral Dissertation
Date Range
2010 2019


As robots become mechanically more capable, they are going to be more and more integrated into our daily lives. Over time, human’s expectation of what the robot capabilities are is getting higher. Therefore, it can be conjectured that often robots will not act as human commanders intended them to do. That is, the users of the robots may have a different point of view from the one the robots do. The first part of this dissertation covers methods that resolve some instances of this mismatch when the mission requirements are expressed in Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) for handling coverage, sequencing, …

Contributors
Kim, Kangjin, Fainekos, Georgios, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2019

While in recent years deep learning (DL) based approaches have been the popular approach in developing end-to-end question answering (QA) systems, such systems lack several desired properties, such as the ability to do sophisticated reasoning with knowledge, the ability to learn using less resources and interpretability. In this thesis, I explore solutions that aim to address these drawbacks. Towards this goal, I work with a specific family of reading comprehension tasks, normally referred to as the Non-Extractive Reading Comprehension (NRC), where the given passage does not contain enough information and to correctly answer sophisticated reasoning and ``additional knowledge" is required. …

Contributors
Mitra, Arindam, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2019

Reasoning with commonsense knowledge is an integral component of human behavior. It is due to this capability that people know that a weak person may not be able to lift someone. It has been a long standing goal of the Artificial Intelligence community to simulate such commonsense reasoning abilities in machines. Over the years, many advances have been made and various challenges have been proposed to test their abilities. The Winograd Schema Challenge (WSC) is one such Natural Language Understanding (NLU) task which was also proposed as an alternative to the Turing Test. It is made up of textual question …

Contributors
Sharma, Arpit, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2019

Knowledge Representation (KR) is one of the prominent approaches to Artificial Intelligence (AI) that is concerned with representing knowledge in a form that computer systems can utilize to solve complex problems. Answer Set Programming (ASP), based on the stable model semantics, is a widely-used KR framework that facilitates elegant and efficient representations for many problem domains that require complex reasoning. However, while ASP is effective on deterministic problem domains, it is not suitable for applications involving quantitative uncertainty, for example, those that require probabilistic reasoning. Furthermore, it is hard to utilize information that can be statistically induced from data with …

Contributors
Wang, Yi, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2019

Teams are increasingly indispensable to achievements in any organizations. Despite the organizations' substantial dependency on teams, fundamental knowledge about the conduct of team-enabled operations is lacking, especially at the {\it social, cognitive} and {\it information} level in relation to team performance and network dynamics. The goal of this dissertation is to create new instruments to {\it predict}, {\it optimize} and {\it explain} teams' performance in the context of composite networks (i.e., social-cognitive-information networks). Understanding the dynamic mechanisms that drive the success of high-performing teams can provide the key insights into building the best teams and hence lift the productivity and …

Contributors
Li, Liangyue, Tong, Hanghang, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2018

Reasoning about the activities of cyber threat actors is critical to defend against cyber attacks. However, this task is difficult for a variety of reasons. In simple terms, it is difficult to determine who the attacker is, what the desired goals are of the attacker, and how they will carry out their attacks. These three questions essentially entail understanding the attacker’s use of deception, the capabilities available, and the intent of launching the attack. These three issues are highly inter-related. If an adversary can hide their intent, they can better deceive a defender. If an adversary’s capabilities are not well …

Contributors
Nunes, Eric, Shakarian, Paulo, Ahn, Gail-Joon, et al.
Created Date
2018

Image Understanding is a long-established discipline in computer vision, which encompasses a body of advanced image processing techniques, that are used to locate (“where”), characterize and recognize (“what”) objects, regions, and their attributes in the image. However, the notion of “understanding” (and the goal of artificial intelligent machines) goes beyond factual recall of the recognized components and includes reasoning and thinking beyond what can be seen (or perceived). Understanding is often evaluated by asking questions of increasing difficulty. Thus, the expected functionalities of an intelligent Image Understanding system can be expressed in terms of the functionalities that are required to …

Contributors
Aditya, Somak, Baral, Chitta, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2018

Reasoning about actions forms the basis of many tasks such as prediction, planning, and diagnosis in a dynamic domain. Within the reasoning about actions community, a broad class of languages, called action languages, has been developed together with a methodology for their use in representing and reasoning about dynamic domains. With a few notable exceptions, the focus of these efforts has largely centered around single-agent systems. Agents rarely operate in a vacuum however, and almost in parallel, substantial work has been done within the dynamic epistemic logic community towards understanding how the actions of an agent may effect not just …

Contributors
Gelfond, Gregory, Baral, Chitta, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2018

Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students’ learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student’s current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on …

Contributors
Zhang, Lishan, VanLehn, Kurt, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2015

Question Answering has been under active research for decades, but it has recently taken the spotlight following IBM Watson's success in Jeopardy! and digital assistants such as Apple's Siri, Google Now, and Microsoft Cortana through every smart-phone and browser. However, most of the research in Question Answering aims at factual questions rather than deep ones such as ``How'' and ``Why'' questions. In this dissertation, I suggest a different approach in tackling this problem. We believe that the answers of deep questions need to be formally defined before found. Because these answers must be defined based on something, it is better …

Contributors
Vo, Nguyen Ha, Baral, Chitta, Lee, Joohyung, et al.
Created Date
2015