Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


With the natural resources of earth depleting very fast, the natural resources of other celestial bodies are considered a potential replacement. Thus, there has been rise of space missions constantly and with it the need of more sophisticated spectrometer devices has increased. The most important requirement in such an application is low area and power consumption. To save area, some scintillators have been developed that can resolve both neutrons and gamma events rather than traditional scintillators which can do only one of these and thus, the spacecraft needs two such devices. But with this development, the requirements out of the …

Contributors
Gupta, Kush, Barnaby, Hugh, Hardgrove, Craig, et al.
Created Date
2017

In thesis, a test time reduction (a low cost test) methodology for digitally-calibrated pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) is presented. A long calibration time is required in the final test to validate performance of these designs. To reduce total test time, optimized calibration technique and calibrated effective number of bits (ENOB) prediction from calibration coefficient will be presented. With the prediction technique, failed devices can be identified only without actual calibration. This technique reduces significant amount of time for the total test time. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Kim, Kibeom, Ozev, Sule, Kitchen, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2013