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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Many neurological disorders, especially those that result in dementia, impact speech and language production. A number of studies have shown that there exist subtle changes in linguistic complexity in these individuals that precede disease onset. However, these studies are conducted on controlled speech samples from a specific task. This thesis explores the possibility of using natural language processing in order to detect declining linguistic complexity from more natural discourse. We use existing data from public figures suspected (or at risk) of suffering from cognitive-linguistic decline, downloaded from the Internet, to detect changes in linguistic complexity. In particular, we focus on …

Contributors
Wang, Shuai, Berisha, Visar, LaCross, Amy, et al.
Created Date
2016

The present study describes audiovisual sentence recognition in normal hearing listeners, bimodal cochlear implant (CI) listeners and bilateral CI listeners. This study explores a new set of sentences (the AzAV sentences) that were created to have equal auditory intelligibility and equal gain from visual information. The aims of Experiment I were to (i) compare the lip reading difficulty of the AzAV sentences to that of other sentence materials, (ii) compare the speech-reading ability of CI listeners to that of normal-hearing listeners and (iii) assess the gain in speech understanding when listeners have both auditory and visual information from easy-to-lip-read and …

Contributors
Wang, Shuai, Dorman, Michael, Berisha, Visar, et al.
Created Date
2015