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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2019


This dissertation will look at large scale collaboration through the lens of online communities to answer questions about what makes a collaboration persist. Results address how collaborations attract contributions, behaviors that could give rise to patterns seen in the data, and the properties of collaborations that drive those behaviors. It is understood that collaborations, online and otherwise, must retain users to remain productive. However, before users can be retained they must be recruited. In the first project, a few necessary properties of the ``attraction'' function are identified by constraining the dynamics of an ODE (Ordinary Differential Equation) model. Additionally, more …

Contributors
Manning, Miles, Janssen, Marcus A, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2017

This dissertation discusses the Cournot competition and competitions in the exploitation of common pool resources and its extension to the tragedy of the commons. I address these models by using potential games and inquire how these models reflect the real competitions for provisions of environmental resources. The Cournot models are dependent upon how many firms there are so that the resultant Cournot-Nash equilibrium is dependent upon the number of firms in oligopoly. But many studies do not take into account how the resultant Cournot-Nash equilibrium is sensitive to the change of the number of firms. Potential games can find out …

Contributors
Mamada, Robert Hideo, Perrings, Charles, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2017

Foraging strategies in social animals are often shaped by change in an organism's natural surrounding. Foraging behavior can hence be highly plastic, time, and condition dependent. The motivation of my research is to explore the effects of dispersal behavior in predators or parasites on population dynamics in heterogeneous environments by developing varied models in different contexts through closely working with ecologists. My models include Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE)-type meta population models and Delay Differential Equation (DDE) models with validation through data. I applied dynamical theory and bifurcation theory with carefully designed numerical simulations to have a better understanding on the …

Contributors
Messan, Komi Segno, Kang, Yun, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2017

Statistical Methods have been widely used in understanding factors for clinical and public health data. Statistical hypotheses are procedures for testing pre-stated hypotheses. The development and properties of these procedures as well as their performance are based upon certain assumptions. Desirable properties of statistical tests are to maintain validity and to perform well even if these assumptions are not met. A statistical test that maintains such desirable properties is called robust. Mathematical models are typically mechanistic framework, used to study dynamic interactions between components (mechanisms) of a system, and how these interactions give rise to the changes in behavior (patterns) …

Contributors
Gonzalez, Beverly, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Mubayi, Anuj, et al.
Created Date
2015

There have been many studies on the dynamics of infectious diseases considering the age structure of the population. This study analyzes the dynamics when the population is stratified by size. This kind of models are useful in the spread of a disease in fisheries where size matters, for microorganism populations or even human diseases that are driven by weight. A simple size structured SIR model is introduced for which a threshold condition, R0, equilibria and stability are established in special cases. Hethcote's approach is used to derive, from first principles, a parallel ODE size-structure system involving n-size classes.The specific case …

Contributors
Torres-Garcia, Griselle, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Feng, Zhilan, et al.
Created Date
2012

Solution methods for certain linear and nonlinear evolution equations are presented in this dissertation. Emphasis is placed mainly on the analytical treatment of nonautonomous differential equations, which are challenging to solve despite the existent numerical and symbolic computational software programs available. Ideas from the transformation theory are adopted allowing one to solve the problems under consideration from a non-traditional perspective. First, the Cauchy initial value problem is considered for a class of nonautonomous and inhomogeneous linear diffusion-type equation on the entire real line. Explicit transformations are used to reduce the equations under study to their corresponding standard forms emphasizing on …

Contributors
Vega-Guzman, Jose M., Sulov, Sergei K, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2013

In the traditional setting of quantum mechanics, the Hamiltonian operator does not depend on time. While some Schrödinger equations with time-dependent Hamiltonians have been solved, explicitly solvable cases are typically scarce. This thesis is a collection of papers in which this first author along with Suslov, Suazo, and Lopez, has worked on solving a series of Schrödinger equations with a time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian that has applications in problems of quantum electrodynamics, lasers, quantum devices such as quantum dots, and external varying fields. In particular the author discusses a new completely integrable case of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in R^n with …

Contributors
Cordero-Soto, Ricardo Javier, Suslov, Sergei, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2011

Analysis of social networks has the potential to provide insights into wide range of applications. As datasets continue to grow, a key challenge is the lack of a widely applicable algorithmic framework for detection of statistically anomalous networks and network properties. Unlike traditional signal processing, where models of truth or empirical verification and background data exist and are often well defined, these features are commonly lacking in social and other networks. Here, a novel algorithmic framework for statistical signal processing for graphs is presented. The framework is based on the analysis of spectral properties of the residuals matrix. The framework …

Contributors
Bliss, Nadya Travinin, Laubichler, Manfred, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2015

The 2009-10 influenza and the 2014-15 Ebola pandemics brought once again urgency to an old question: What are the limits on prediction and what can be proposed that is useful in the face of an epidemic outbreak? This thesis looks first at the impact that limited access to vaccine stockpiles may have on a single influenza outbreak. The purpose is to highlight the challenges faced by populations embedded in inadequate health systems and to identify and assess ways of ameliorating the impact of resource limitations on public health policy. Age-specific per capita constraint rates play an important role on the …

Contributors
Morales-Rosado, Romarie, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, Mubayi, Anuj, et al.
Created Date
2016

Understanding the consequences of changes in social networks is an important an- thropological research goal. This dissertation looks at the role of data-driven social networks on infectious disease transmission and evolution. The dissertation has two projects. The first project is an examination of the effects of the superspreading phenomenon, wherein a relatively few individuals are responsible for a dispropor- tionate number of secondary cases, on the patterns of an infectious disease. The second project examines the timing of the initial introduction of tuberculosis (TB) to the human population. The results suggest that TB has a long evolutionary history with hunter-gatherers. …

Contributors
Nesse, Hans P, Hurtado, Ana Magdalena, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2019