Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Memory systems are becoming increasingly error-prone, and thus guaranteeing their reliability is a major challenge. In this dissertation, new techniques to improve the reliability of both 2D and 3D dynamic random access memory (DRAM) systems are presented. The proposed schemes have higher reliability than current systems but with lower power, better performance and lower hardware cost. First, a low overhead solution that improves the reliability of commodity DRAM systems with no change in the existing memory architecture is presented. Specifically, five erasure and error correction (E-ECC) schemes are proposed that provide at least Chipkill-Correct protection for x4 (Schemes 1, 2 …

Contributors
Chen, Hsing-Min, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Mudge, Trevor, et al.
Created Date
2017

Stream computing has emerged as an importantmodel of computation for embedded system applications particularly in the multimedia and network processing domains. In recent past several programming languages and embedded multi-core processors have been proposed for streaming applications. This thesis examines the execution and dynamic scheduling of stream programs on embedded multi-core processors. The thesis addresses the problem in the context of a multi-tasking environment with a time varying allocation of processing elements for a particular streaming application. As a solution the thesis proposes a two step approach where the stream program is compiled to gather key application information, and to …

Contributors
Lee, Haeseung, Chatha, Karamvir, Vrudhula, Sarma, et al.
Created Date
2013

With the massive multithreading execution feature, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely deployed to accelerate general-purpose parallel workloads (GPGPUs). However, using GPUs to accelerate computation does not always gain good performance improvement. This is mainly due to three inefficiencies in modern GPU and system architectures. First, not all parallel threads have a uniform amount of workload to fully utilize GPU’s computation ability, leading to a sub-optimal performance problem, called warp criticality. To mitigate the degree of warp criticality, I propose a Criticality-Aware Warp Acceleration mechanism, called CAWA. CAWA predicts and accelerates the critical warp execution by allocating larger execution …

Contributors
Lee, Shin-Ying, Wu, Carole-Jean, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2017

Stream processing has emerged as an important model of computation especially in the context of multimedia and communication sub-systems of embedded System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures. The dataflow nature of streaming applications allows them to be most naturally expressed as a set of kernels iteratively operating on continuous streams of data. The kernels are computationally intensive and are mainly characterized by real-time constraints that demand high throughput and data bandwidth with limited global data reuse. Conventional architectures fail to meet these demands due to their poorly matched execution models and the overheads associated with instruction and data movements. This work presents StreamWorks, …

Contributors
Panda, Amrit Kumar, Chatha, Karam S., Wu, Carole-Jean, et al.
Created Date
2014

Energy consumption of the data centers worldwide is rapidly growing fueled by ever-increasing demand for Cloud computing applications ranging from social networking to e-commerce. Understandably, ensuring energy-efficiency and sustainability of Cloud data centers without compromising performance is important for both economic and environmental reasons. This dissertation develops a cyber-physical multi-tier server and workload management architecture which operates at the local and the global (geo-distributed) data center level. We devise optimization frameworks for each tier to optimize energy consumption, energy cost and carbon footprint of the data centers. The proposed solutions are aware of various energy management tradeoffs that manifest due …

Contributors
Abbasi, Zahra, Gupta, Sandeep K. S., Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2014

With increasing transistor volume and reducing feature size, it has become a major design constraint to reduce power consumption also. This has given rise to aggressive architectural changes for on-chip power management and rapid development to energy efficient hardware accelerators. Accordingly, the objective of this research work is to facilitate software developers to leverage these hardware techniques and improve energy efficiency of the system. To achieve this, I propose two solutions for Linux kernel: Optimal use of these architectural enhancements to achieve greater energy efficiency requires accurate modeling of processor power consumption. Though there are many models available in literature …

Contributors
Desai, Digant, Vrudhula, Sarma, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2013