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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


With the maturity of advanced composites as feasible structural materials for various applications there is a critical need to solve the challenge of designing these material systems for optimal performance. However, determining superior design methods requires a deep understanding of the material-structure properties at various length scales. Due to the length-scale dependent behavior of advanced composites, multiscale modeling techniques may be used to describe the dominant mechanisms of damage and failure in these material systems. With polymer matrix fiber composites and nanocomposites it becomes essential to include even the atomic length scale, where the resin-hardener-nanofiller molecules interact, in the multiscale …

Contributors
Rai, Ashwin, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2018

Nanomaterials (NMs), implemented into a plethora of consumer products, are a potential new class of pollutants with unknown hazards to the environment. Exposure assessment is necessary for hazard assessment, life cycle analysis, and environmental monitoring. Current nanomaterial detection techniques on complex matrices are expensive and time intensive, requiring weeks of sample preparation and detection by specialized equipment, limiting the feasibility of large-scale monitoring of NMs. A need exists to develop a rapid pre-screening technique to detect, within minutes, nanomaterials in complex matrices. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a tiered process to detect and characterize nanomaterials in consumer …

Contributors
Schoepf, Jared, Westerhoff, Paul, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2018

In recent years, a new type of ionic salt based solid propellant, considered inert until the application of an electric current induces an electro-chemical reaction, has been under investigation due to its broad range of possible uses. However, while many electric propellant formulations and applications have been explored over the years, a fundamental understanding of the operational mechanisms of this propellant is necessary in order to move forward with development and implementation of this technology. It has been suggested that the metallic additive included in the formulation studied during this investigation may be playing an additional, currently unknown role in …

Contributors
Brunacini, Lauren, Middleton, James, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2019

A new type of electronics was envisioned, namely edible electronics. Edible electronics are made by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) certified edible materials which can be eaten and digested by human body. Different from implantable electronics, test or treatment using edible electronics doesn’t require operations and perioperative complications. This dissertation bridges the food industry, material sciences, device fabrication, and biomedical engineering by demonstrating edible supercapacitors and electronic components and devices such as pH sensor. Edible supercapacitors were fabricated using food materials from grocery store. 5 of them were connected in series to power a snake camera. Tests result showed that …

Contributors
Xu, Wenwen, Jiang, Hanqing, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2019

Among the alternative processes for the traditional distillation, adsorption and membrane separations are the two most promising candidates and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are the new material candidate as adsorbent or membrane due to their high surface area, various pore sizes, and highly tunable framework functionality. This dissertation presents an investigation of the formation process of MOF membrane, framework defects, and two-dimensional (2D) MOFs, aiming to explore the answers for three critical questions: (1) how to obtain a continuous MOF membrane, (2) how defects form in MOF framework, and (3) how to obtain isolated 2D MOFs. To solve the first problem, …

Contributors
Shan, Bohan, Mu, Bin, Forzani, Erica, et al.
Created Date
2019

Hydrogel polymers have been the subject of many studies, due to their fascinating ability to alternate between being hydrophilic and hydrophobic, upon the application of appropriate stimuli. In particular, thermo-responsive hydrogels such as N-Isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), which possess a unique lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 32°C, have been leveraged for membrane-based processes such as using NIPAM as a draw agent for forward osmosis (FO) desalination. The low LCST temperature of NIPAM ensures that fresh water can be recovered, at a modest energy cost as compared to other thermally based desalination processes which require water recovery at higher temperatures. This work …

Contributors
Abdullahi, Adnan None, Phelan, Patrick, Wang, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2019