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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2011 2017


The ability to manipulate the interaction between small molecules and biological macromolecules towards the study of disease pathogenesis has become a very important part of research towards treatment options for various diseases. The work described here shows both the use of DNA oligonucleotides as carriers for a nicotine hapten small molecule, and the use of microsomes to study the stability of compounds derived to treat mitochondrial diseases. Nicotine addiction is a worldwide epidemic because nicotine is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It is linked to early death, typically in the form of heart or lung disease. A ...

Contributors
Schmierer, Margaret Louise, Hecht, Sidney M, Allen, James, et al.
Created Date
2016

Multivalency is an important phenomenon that guides numerous biological interactions. It has been utilized in design of therapeutics and drug candidates. Hence, this study attempts to develop analytical tools to study multivalent interactions and design multivalent ligands for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been envisioned as a means of nanodiagnostics due to its single molecule sensitivity. However, the AFM based recognition imaging lacks a multiplex capacity to detect multiple analytes in a single test. Also there is no user friendly wet chemistry to functionalize AFM tips. Hence, an uncatalyzed Click Chemistry protocol was developed to ...

Contributors
Manna, Saikat, Lindsay, Stuart, Zhang, Peiming, et al.
Created Date
2016

The bleomycins are a family of glycopeptide-derived antibiotics isolated from various Streptomyces species and have been the subject of much attention from the scientific community as a consequence of their antitumor activity. Bleomycin clinically and is an integral part of a number of combination chemotherapy regimens. It has previously been shown that bleomycin has the ability to selectively target tumor cells over their non-malignant counterparts. Pyrimidoblamic acid, the N-terminal metal ion binding domain of bleomycin is known to be the moiety that is responsible for O2 activation and the subsequent chemistry leading to DNA strand scission and overall antitumor activity. ...

Contributors
Bozeman, Trevor, Hecht, Sidney M, Chaput, John, et al.
Created Date
2013

Natural photosynthesis features a complex biophysical/chemical process that requires sunlight to produce energy rich products. It is one of the most important processes responsible for the appearance and sustainability of life on earth. The first part of the thesis focuses on understanding the mechanisms involved in regulation of light harvesting, which is necessary to balance the absorption and utilization of light energy and in that way reduce the effect caused by photooxidative damage. In photosynthesis, carotenoids are responsible not only for collection of light, but also play a major role in protecting the photosynthetic system. To investigate the role of ...

Contributors
Pillai, Smitha Thulasi, Moore, Ana, Moore, Thomas, et al.
Created Date
2011

A clean and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels is solar energy. For efficient use of solar energy to be realized, artificial systems that can effectively capture and convert sunlight into a usable form of energy have to be developed. In natural photosynthesis, antenna chlorophylls and carotenoids capture sunlight and transfer the resulting excitation energy to the photosynthetic reaction center (PRC). Small reorganization energy, λ and well-balanced electronic coupling between donors and acceptors in the PRC favor formation of a highly efficient charge-separated (CS) state. By covalently linking electron/energy donors to acceptors, organic molecular dyads and triads that mimic natural photosynthesis ...

Contributors
Arero, Jaro, Gust, Devens, Moore, Ana, et al.
Created Date
2014

For reading DNA bases more accurately, a series of nitrogen-containing aromatic heterocycles have been designed and synthesized as candidates of universal reader to interact with all naturally occurring DNA nucleobases by hydrogen bonding interaction and eventually is used to read DNA by recognition tunneling. These recognition molecules include 6-mercapto-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2-carboxamide, 5-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1H-imidazole-2-carboxamide, 5-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4H-1,2,4-traizole-3-carboxamide and 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide. Their formation of hydrogen bonding complexes with nucleobases was studied and association constants were measured by proton NMR titration experiments in deuterated chloroform at room temperature. To do so, the mercaptoethyl chain or thiol group of these reading molecules was replaced or protected with the more lipophilic ...

Contributors
Biswas, Sovan, Lindsay, Stuart, Zhang, Peiming, et al.
Created Date
2016

Scientists around the world have been striving to develop artificial light-harvesting antenna model systems for energy and other light-driven biochemical applications. Among the various approaches to achieve this goal, one of the most promising is the assembly of structurally well-defined artificial light-harvesting antennas based on the principles of structural DNA nanotechnology. DNA has recently emerged as an extremely efficient material to organize molecules such as fluorophores and proteins on the nanoscale. It is desirable to develop a hybrid smart material by combining artificial antenna systems based on DNA with natural reaction center components, so that the material can be engineered ...

Contributors
Dutta, Palash Kanti, Liu, Yan, Yan, Hao, et al.
Created Date
2014

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) or semiconductor nanocrystals are often used to describe 2 to 20 nm solution processed nanoparticles of various semiconductor materials that display quantum confinement effects. Compared to traditional fluorescent organic dyes, QDs provide many advantages. For biological applications it is necessary to develop reliable methods to functionalize QDs with hydrophilic biomolecules so that they may maintain their stability and functionality in physiological conditions. DNA, a molecule that encodes genetic information, is arguably the smartest molecule that nature has ever produced and one of the most explored bio-macromolecules. DNA directed self-assembly can potentially organize QDs that are functionalized ...

Contributors
Samanta, Anirban, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a biopolymer well known for its role in preserving genetic information in biology, is now drawing great deal of interest from material scientists. Ease of synthesis, predictable molecular recognition via Watson-Crick base pairing, vast numbers of available chemical modifications, and intrinsic nanoscale size makes DNA a suitable material for the construction of a plethora of nanostructures that can be used as scaffold to organize functional molecules with nanometer precision. This dissertation focuses on DNA-directed organization of metallic nanoparticles into well-defined, discrete structures and using them to study photonic interaction between fluorophore and metal particle. Presented here are ...

Contributors
Pal, Suchetan, Liu, Yan, Yan, Hao, et al.
Created Date
2012

As the genetic information storage vehicle, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules are essential to all known living organisms and many viruses. It is amazing that such a large amount of information about how life develops can be stored in these tiny molecules. Countless scientists, especially some biologists, are trying to decipher the genetic information stored in these captivating molecules. Meanwhile, another group of researchers, nanotechnologists in particular, have discovered that the unique and concise structural features of DNA together with its information coding ability can be utilized for nano-construction efforts. This idea culminated in the birth of the field of DNA ...

Contributors
Han, Dongran, Yan, Hao, Liu, Yan, et al.
Created Date
2012