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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Passive flow control achieved by surface dimpling can be an effective strategy for reducing drag around bluff bodies - an example of substantial popular interest being the flow around a golf ball. While the general effect of dimples causing a delay of boundary layer separation is well known, the mechanisms contributing to this phenomena are subtle and not thoroughly understood. Numerical models offer a powerful approach for studying drag reduction, however simulation strategies are challenged by complex geometries, and in applications the introduction of ad hoc turbulence models which introduce additional uncertainty. These and other factors provide much of the …

Contributors
Mode, Jeffrey Michael, Squires, Kyle, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2010

Microchannel heat sinks can possess heat transfer characteristics unavailable in conventional heat exchangers; such sinks offer compact solutions to otherwise intractable thermal management problems, notably in small-scale electronics cooling. Flow boiling in microchannels allows a very high heat transfer rate, but is bounded by the critical heat flux (CHF). This thesis presents a theoretical-numerical study of a method to improve the heat rejection capability of a microchannel heat sink via expansion of the channel cross-section along the flow direction. The thermodynamic quality of the refrigerant increases during flow boiling, decreasing the density of the bulk coolant as it flows. This …

Contributors
Miner, Mark Jeffrey, Phelan, Patrick E, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2011

The Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster is an electromagnetic thruster that produces a higher specific impulse than conventional chemical rockets and greater thrust densities than electrostatic thrusters, but the well-known operational limit---referred to as ``onset"---imposes a severe limitation efficiency and lifetime. This phenomenon is associated with large fluctuations in operating voltage, high rates of electrode erosion, and three-dimensional instabilities in the plasma flow-field which cannot be adequately represented by two-dimensional, axisymmetric models. Simulations of the Princeton Benchmark Thruster (PBT) were conducted using the three-dimensional version of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, MACH. Validation of the numerical model is partially achieved by comparison to …

Contributors
Parma, Brian, Mikellides, Pavlos G, Squires, Kyle, et al.
Created Date
2011

The evolution of single hairpin vortices and multiple interacting hairpin vortices are studied in direct numerical simulations of channel flow at Re-tau=395. The purpose of this study is to observe the effects of increased Reynolds number and varying initial conditions on the growth of hairpins and the conditions under which single hairpins autogenerate hairpin packets. The hairpin vortices are believed to provide a unified picture of wall turbulence and play an important role in the production of Reynolds shear stress which is directly related to turbulent drag. The structures of the initial three-dimensional vortices are extracted from the two-point spatial …

Contributors
Parthasarathy, Praveen Kumar, Adrian, Ronald, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2011

A new method of adaptive mesh generation for the computation of fluid flows is investigated. The method utilizes gradients of the flow solution to adapt the size and stretching of elements or volumes in the computational mesh as is commonly done in the conventional Hessian approach. However, in the new method, higher-order gradients are used in place of the Hessian. The method is applied to the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on model problems. Results indicate that a significant efficiency benefit is realized. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Shortridge, Randall Raymond, Chen, Kang Ping, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2011

Multiphase flows are an important part of many natural and technological phe- nomena such as ocean-air coupling (which is important for climate modeling) and the atomization of liquid fuel jets in combustion engines. The unique challenges of multiphase flow often make analytical solutions to the governing equations impos- sible and experimental investigations very difficult. Thus, high-fidelity numerical simulations can play a pivotal role in understanding these systems. This disserta- tion describes numerical methods developed for complex multiphase flows and the simulations performed using these methods. First, the issue of multiphase code verification is addressed. Code verification answers the question "Is …

Contributors
Brady, Peter, Herrmann, Marcus, Lopez, Juan, et al.
Created Date
2011

The flow around a golf ball is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). An immersed boundary approach is adopted in which the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a fractional step method on a structured, staggered grid in cylindrical coordinates. The boundary conditions on the surface are imposed using momentum forcing in the vicinity of the boundary. The flow solver is parallelized using a domain decomposition strategy and message passing interface (MPI), and exhibits linear scaling on as many as 500 processors. A laminar flow case is presented to verify the formal accuracy of the method. The immersed boundary approach …

Contributors
Smith, Clinton Elliott, Squires, Kyle D, Balaras, Elias, et al.
Created Date
2011

A numerical study of incremental spin-up and spin-up from rest of a thermally- stratified fluid enclosed within a right circular cylinder with rigid bottom and side walls and stress-free upper surface is presented. Thermally stratified spin-up is a typical example of baroclinity, which is initiated by a sudden increase in rotation rate and the tilting of isotherms gives rise to baroclinic source of vorticity. Research by (Smirnov et al. [2010a]) showed the differences in evolution of instabilities when Dirichlet and Neumann thermal boundary conditions were applied at top and bottom walls. Study of parametric variations carried out in this dissertation …

Contributors
Kher, Aditya Deepak, Chen, Kangping, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2011

Recent literature indicates potential benefits in microchannel cooling if an inlet orifice is used to suppress pressure oscillations that develop under two-phase conditions. This study investigates the costs and benefits of using an adjustable microchannel inlet orifice. The focus is on orifice effect during steady-state boiling and critical heat flux (CHF) in the channels using R134a in a pumped refrigerant loop (PRL). To change orifice size, a dam controlled with a micrometer was placed in front of 31 parallel microchannels. Each channel had a hydraulic diameter of 0.235 mm and a length of 1.33 cm. For steady state two-phase conditions, …

Contributors
Odom, Brent A., Phelan, Patrick E, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2012

Next generation gas turbines will be required to produce low concentrations of pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and soot. In order to design gas turbines which produce lower emissions it is essential to have computational tools to help designers. Over the past few decades, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played a key role in the design of turbomachinary and will be heavily relied upon for the design of future components. In order to design components with the least amount of experimental rig testing, the ensemble of submodels used in simulations must be known to accurately …

Contributors
Spencer, Jeffrey, Herrmann, Marcus, Chen, Kangping, et al.
Created Date
2012