Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Rapid expansion of dense beds of fine, spherical particles subjected to rapid depressurization is studied in a vertical shock tube. As the particle bed is unloaded, a high-speed video camera captures the dramatic evolution of the particle bed structure. Pressure transducers are used to measure the dynamic pressure changes during the particle bed expansion process. Image processing, signal processing, and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques, are used to examine the relationships between particle size, initial bed height, bed expansion rate, and gas velocities. The gas-particle interface and the particle bed as a whole expand and evolve in stages. First, the bed …

Contributors
Zunino, Heather, Adrian, Ronald J, Clarke, Amanda, et al.
Created Date
2019

A numerical study of incremental spin-up and spin-up from rest of a thermally- stratified fluid enclosed within a right circular cylinder with rigid bottom and side walls and stress-free upper surface is presented. Thermally stratified spin-up is a typical example of baroclinity, which is initiated by a sudden increase in rotation rate and the tilting of isotherms gives rise to baroclinic source of vorticity. Research by (Smirnov et al. [2010a]) showed the differences in evolution of instabilities when Dirichlet and Neumann thermal boundary conditions were applied at top and bottom walls. Study of parametric variations carried out in this dissertation …

Contributors
Kher, Aditya Deepak, Chen, Kangping, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2011

The three-dimensional flow contained in a rapidly rotating circular split cylinder is studied numerically solving the Navier--Stokes equations. The cylinder is completely filled with fluid and is split at the midplane. Three different types of boundary conditions were imposed, leading to a variety of instabilities and complex flow dynamics. The first configuration has a strong background rotation and a small differential rotation between the two halves. The axisymmetric flow was first studied identifying boundary layer instabilities which produce inertial waves under some conditions. Limit cycle states and quasiperiodic states were found, including some period doubling bifurcations. Then, a three-dimensional study …

Contributors
Gutierrez Castillo, Paloma, Lopez, Juan M., Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2017

Passive flow control achieved by surface dimpling can be an effective strategy for reducing drag around bluff bodies - an example of substantial popular interest being the flow around a golf ball. While the general effect of dimples causing a delay of boundary layer separation is well known, the mechanisms contributing to this phenomena are subtle and not thoroughly understood. Numerical models offer a powerful approach for studying drag reduction, however simulation strategies are challenged by complex geometries, and in applications the introduction of ad hoc turbulence models which introduce additional uncertainty. These and other factors provide much of the …

Contributors
Mode, Jeffrey Michael, Squires, Kyle, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2010

Structural features of canonical wall-bounded turbulent flows are described using several techniques, including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The canonical wall-bounded turbulent flows of channels, pipes, and flat-plate boundary layers include physics important to a wide variety of practical fluid flows with a minimum of geometric complications. Yet, significant questions remain for their turbulent motions' form, organization to compose very long motions, and relationship to vortical structures. POD extracts highly energetic structures from flow fields and is one tool to further understand the turbulence physics. A variety of direct numerical simulations provide velocity fields suitable for detailed analysis. Since POD modes …

Contributors
Baltzer, Jon Ronald, Adrian, Ronald J, Calhoun, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2012

This study identifies the influence that leading-edge shape has on the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing using surface far-field and near-field analysis. It examines if a wake survey is the appropriate means for measuring profile drag and induced drag. The paper unveils the differences between sharp leading-edge and blunt leading-edge wings with the tools of pressure loop, chordwise pressure distribution, span load plots and with wake integral computations. The analysis was performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), vortex lattice potential flow code (VORLAX), and a few wind-tunnels runs to acquire data for comparison. This study found that sharp leading-edge wings …

Contributors
Ou, Che Wei, Takahashi, Timothy, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2019

A new theoretical model was developed utilizing energy conservation methods in order to determine the fully-atomized cross-sectional Sauter mean diameters of pressure-swirl atomizers. A detailed boundary-layer assessment led to the development of a new viscous dissipation model for droplets in the spray. Integral momentum methods were also used to determine the complete velocity history of the droplets and entrained gas in the spray. The model was extensively validated through comparison with experiment and it was found that the model could predict the correct droplet size with high accuracy for a wide range of operating conditions. Based on detailed analysis, it …

Contributors
Moradi, Ali, Lee, Taewoo, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2013

The Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster is an electromagnetic thruster that produces a higher specific impulse than conventional chemical rockets and greater thrust densities than electrostatic thrusters, but the well-known operational limit---referred to as ``onset"---imposes a severe limitation efficiency and lifetime. This phenomenon is associated with large fluctuations in operating voltage, high rates of electrode erosion, and three-dimensional instabilities in the plasma flow-field which cannot be adequately represented by two-dimensional, axisymmetric models. Simulations of the Princeton Benchmark Thruster (PBT) were conducted using the three-dimensional version of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, MACH. Validation of the numerical model is partially achieved by comparison to …

Contributors
Parma, Brian, Mikellides, Pavlos G, Squires, Kyle, et al.
Created Date
2011

Many defense, healthcare, and energy applications can benefit from the development of surfaces that easily shed droplets of liquids of interest. Desired wetting properties are typically achieved via altering the surface chemistry or topography or both through surface engineering. Despite many recent advancements, materials modified only on their exterior are still prone to physical degradation and lack durability. In contrast to surface engineering, this thesis focuses on altering the bulk composition and the interior of a material to tune how an exterior surface would interact with liquids. Fundamental and applied aspects of engineering of two material systems with low contact …

Contributors
Damle, Viraj Gangadhar, Rykaczewski, Konrad, Phelan, Patrick, et al.
Created Date
2017