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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Autonomic closure is a new general methodology for subgrid closures in large eddy simulations that circumvents the need to specify fixed closure models and instead allows a fully- adaptive self-optimizing closure. The closure is autonomic in the sense that the simulation itself determines the optimal relation at each point and time between any subgrid term and the variables in the simulation, through the solution of a local system identification problem. It is based on highly generalized representations of subgrid terms having degrees of freedom that are determined dynamically at each point and time in the simulation. This can be regarded …

Contributors
Kshitij, Abhinav, Dahm, Werner J.A., Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2019

The evolution of single hairpin vortices and multiple interacting hairpin vortices are studied in direct numerical simulations of channel flow at Re-tau=395. The purpose of this study is to observe the effects of increased Reynolds number and varying initial conditions on the growth of hairpins and the conditions under which single hairpins autogenerate hairpin packets. The hairpin vortices are believed to provide a unified picture of wall turbulence and play an important role in the production of Reynolds shear stress which is directly related to turbulent drag. The structures of the initial three-dimensional vortices are extracted from the two-point spatial …

Contributors
Parthasarathy, Praveen Kumar, Adrian, Ronald, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2011

The central purpose of this work is to investigate the large-scale, coherent structures that exist in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) when the domain is large enough for the classical ”wind of turbulence” to break down. The study exclusively focuses on the structures that from when the RBC geometry is a cylinder. A series of visualization studies, Fourier analysis and proper orthogonal decomposition are employed to qualitatively and quantitatively inspect the large-scale structures’ length and time scales, spatial organization, and dynamic properties. The data in this study is generated by direct numerical simulation to resolve all the scales of turbulence in …

Contributors
Sakievich, Philip Sakievich, Peet, Yulia, Adrian, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2017