Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2018

The Volume-of-Fluid method is a popular method for interface tracking in Multiphase applications within Computational Fluid Dynamics. To date there exists several algorithms for reconstruction of a geometric interface surface. Of these are the Finite Difference algorithm, Least Squares Volume-of-Fluid Interface Reconstruction Algorithm, LVIRA, and the Efficient Least Squares Volume-of-Fluid Interface Reconstruction Algorithm, ELVIRA. Along with these geometric interface reconstruction algorithms, there exist several volume-of-fluid transportation algorithms. This paper will discuss two operator-splitting advection algorithms and an unsplit advection algorithm. Using these three interface reconstruction algorithms, and three advection algorithms, a comparison will be drawn to see how different combinations ...

Contributors
Kedelty, Dominic Sebastian, Herrmann, Marcus, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2015

Multi-touch tablets and smart phones are now widely used in both workplace and consumer settings. Interacting with these devices requires hand and arm movements that are potentially complex and poorly understood. Experimental studies have revealed differences in performance that could potentially be associated with injury risk. However, underlying causes for performance differences are often difficult to identify. For example, many patterns of muscle activity can potentially result in similar behavioral output. Muscle activity is one factor contributing to forces in tissues that could contribute to injury. However, experimental measurements of muscle activity and force for humans are extremely challenging. Models ...

Contributors
Lee, Jong Hwa, Jindrich, Devin L., Artemiadis, Panagiotis K., et al.
Created Date
2014

A new method of adaptive mesh generation for the computation of fluid flows is investigated. The method utilizes gradients of the flow solution to adapt the size and stretching of elements or volumes in the computational mesh as is commonly done in the conventional Hessian approach. However, in the new method, higher-order gradients are used in place of the Hessian. The method is applied to the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on model problems. Results indicate that a significant efficiency benefit is realized. Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Shortridge, Randall Raymond, Chen, Kang Ping, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2011

The flow of liquid PDMS (10:1 v/v base to cross-linker ratio) in open, rectangular silicon micro channels, with and without a hexa-methyl-di-silazane (HMDS) or poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) (120 nm) coat, was studied. Photolithographic patterning and etching of silicon wafers was used to create micro channels with a range of widths (5-50 μm) and depths (5-20 μm). The experimental PDMS flow rates were compared to an analytical model based on the work of Lucas and Washburn. The experimental flow rates closely matched the predicted flow rates for channels with an aspect ratio (width to depth), p, between one and two. Flow rates ...

Contributors
Sowers, Timothy Wayne, Rajagopalan, Jagannathan, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2014

Climate change has been one of the major issues of global economic and social concerns in the past decade. To quantitatively predict global climate change, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of the United Nations have organized a multi-national effort to use global atmosphere-ocean models to project anthropogenically induced climate changes in the 21st century. The computer simulations performed with those models and archived by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 5 (CMIP5) form the most comprehensive quantitative basis for the prediction of global environmental changes on decadal-to-centennial time scales. While the CMIP5 archives have been widely used ...

Contributors
Kulkarni, Sujay, Huang, Huei-Ping, Calhoun, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2014

ABSTRACT A large fraction of the total energy consumption in the world comes from heating and cooling of buildings. Improving the energy efficiency of buildings to reduce the needs of seasonal heating and cooling is one of the major challenges in sustainable development. In general, the energy efficiency depends on the geometry and material of the buildings. To explore a framework for accurately assessing this dependence, detailed 3-D thermofluid simulations are performed by systematically sweeping the parameter space spanned by four parameters: the size of building, thickness and material of wall, and fractional size of window. The simulations incorporate realistic ...

Contributors
Jain, Gaurav, Huang, Huei-Ping, Ren, Yi, et al.
Created Date
2016

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation is the industry standard for computing practical turbulent flows -- since large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) require comparatively massive computational power to simulate even relatively simple flows. RANS, like LES, requires that a user specify a “closure model” for the underlying turbulence physics. However, despite more than 60 years of research into turbulence modeling, current models remain largely unable to accurately predict key aspects of the complex turbulent flows frequently encountered in practical engineering applications. Recently a new approach, termed “autonomic closure”, has been developed for LES that avoids the need to ...

Contributors
Ahlf, Rick, Dahm, Werner J.A., Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2017

This study uses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling to analyze the dependence of wind power potential and turbulence intensity on aerodynamic design of a special type of building with a nuzzle-like gap at its rooftop. Numerical simulations using ANSYS Fluent are carried out to quantify the above-mentioned dependency due to three major geometric parameters of the building: (i) the height of the building, (ii) the depth of the roof-top gap, and (iii) the width of the roof-top gap. The height of the building is varied from 8 m to 24 m. Likewise, the gap depth is varied from 3 m ...

Contributors
Kailkhura, Gargi, Huang, Huei-Ping, Rajagopalan, Jagannathan, et al.
Created Date
2017

This study performs numerical modeling for the climate of semi-arid regions by running a high-resolution atmospheric model constrained by large-scale climatic boundary conditions, a practice commonly called climate downscaling. These investigations focus especially on precipitation and temperature, quantities that are critical to life in semi-arid regions. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, a non-hydrostatic geophysical fluid dynamical model with a full suite of physical parameterization, a series of numerical sensitivity experiments are conducted to test how the intensity and spatial/temporal distribution of precipitation change with grid resolution, time step size, the resolution of lower boundary topography and surface ...

Contributors
Sharma, Ashish, Huang, Huei-Ping, Adrian, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2012

The numerical climate models have provided scientists, policy makers and the general public, crucial information for climate projections since mid-20th century. An international effort to compare and validate the simulations of all major climate models is organized by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP), which has gone through several phases since 1995 with CMIP5 being the state of the art. In parallel, an organized effort to consolidate all observational data in the past century culminates in the creation of several "reanalysis" datasets that are considered the closest representation of the true observation. This study compared the climate variability and trend ...

Contributors
Paek, Houk, Huang, Huei-Ping, Adrian, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2013

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.