ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Date Range
2010 2017

This research work uses the Weather Research and Forecasting Model to study the effect of large wind farms with an area of 900 square kilometers and a high power density of 7.58 W/m2 on regional climate. Simulations were performed with a wind farm parameterization scheme turned on in south Oregon. Control cases were also run with the parameterization scheme turned off. The primary emphasis was on offshore wind farms. Some analysis on onshore wind farms was also performed. The effects of these wind farms were studied on the vertical profiles of temperature, wind speed, and moisture as well as on ...

Contributors
George, Sushant, Huang, Huei-Ping, Wang, Zhihua, et al.
Created Date
2016

Space systems such as communication satellites, earth observation satellites and telescope require accurate pointing to observe fixed targets over prolonged time. These systems typically use reaction wheels to slew the spacecraft and gimballing systems containing motors to achieve precise pointing. Motor based actuators have limited life as they contain moving parts that require lubrication in space. Alternate methods have utilized piezoelectric actuators. This paper presents Shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators for control of a deployable antenna placed on a satellite. The SMAs are operated as a series of distributed linear actuators. These distributed linear actuators are not prone to single ...

Contributors
Sonawane, Nikhil, Thangavelautham, Jekanthan, Huang, Huei-Ping, et al.
Created Date
2016

This study uses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling to analyze the dependence of wind power potential and turbulence intensity on aerodynamic design of a special type of building with a nuzzle-like gap at its rooftop. Numerical simulations using ANSYS Fluent are carried out to quantify the above-mentioned dependency due to three major geometric parameters of the building: (i) the height of the building, (ii) the depth of the roof-top gap, and (iii) the width of the roof-top gap. The height of the building is varied from 8 m to 24 m. Likewise, the gap depth is varied from 3 m ...

Contributors
Kailkhura, Gargi, Huang, Huei-Ping, Rajagopalan, Jagannathan, et al.
Created Date
2017

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation is the industry standard for computing practical turbulent flows -- since large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) require comparatively massive computational power to simulate even relatively simple flows. RANS, like LES, requires that a user specify a “closure model” for the underlying turbulence physics. However, despite more than 60 years of research into turbulence modeling, current models remain largely unable to accurately predict key aspects of the complex turbulent flows frequently encountered in practical engineering applications. Recently a new approach, termed “autonomic closure”, has been developed for LES that avoids the need to ...

Contributors
Ahlf, Rick, Dahm, Werner J.A., Wells, Valana, et al.
Created Date
2017

A moving overlapping mesh methodology that achieves spectral accuracy in space and up to second-order accuracy in time is developed for solution of unsteady incompressible flow equations in three-dimensional domains. The targeted applications are in aerospace and mechanical engineering domains and involve problems in turbomachinery, rotary aircrafts, wind turbines and others. The methodology is built within the dual-session communication framework initially developed for stationary overlapping meshes. The methodology employs semi-implicit spectral element discretization of equations in each subdomain and explicit treatment of subdomain interfaces with spectrally-accurate spatial interpolation and high-order accurate temporal extrapolation, and requires few, if any, iterations, yet ...

Contributors
Merrill, Brandon Earl, Peet, Yulia, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2016

The study of deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) in explosives is of prime importance with regards to insensitive munitions (IM). Critical damage owing to thermal or shock stimuli could translate to significant loss of life and material. The present study models detonation and deflagration of a commonly used granular explosive: cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine, HMX. A robust literature review is followed by computational modeling of gas gun and DDT tube test data using the Sandia National Lab three-dimensional multi-material Eulerian hydrocode CTH. This dissertation proposes new computational practices and models that aid in predicting shock stimulus IM response. CTH was first used to ...

Contributors
Mahon, Kelly Susan, Lee, Taewoo, Herrmann, Marcus, et al.
Created Date
2015

Ten regional climate models (RCMs) and atmosphere-ocean generalized model parings from the North America Regional Climate Change Assessment Program were used to estimate the shift of extreme precipitation due to climate change using present-day and future-day climate scenarios. RCMs emulate winter storms and one-day duration events at the sub-regional level. Annual maximum series were derived for each model pairing, each modeling period; and for annual and winter seasons. The reliability ensemble average (REA) method was used to qualify each RCM annual maximum series to reproduce historical records and approximate average predictions, because there are no future records. These series determined ...

Contributors
Riano, Alejandro, Mays, Larry W, Vivoni, Enrique, et al.
Created Date
2013

Development of renewable energy solutions has become a major interest among environmental organizations and governments around the world due to an increase in energy consumption and global warming. One fast growing renewable energy solution is the application of wind energy in cities. To qualitative and quantitative predict wind turbine performance in urban areas, CFD simulation is performed on real-life urban geometry and wind velocity profiles are evaluated. Two geometries in Arizona is selected in this thesis to demonstrate the influence of building heights; one of the simulation models, ASU campus, is relatively low rise and without significant tall buildings; the ...

Contributors
Ying, Xiaoyan, Huang, Huei-Ping, Peet, Yulia, et al.
Created Date
2015

ABSTRACT A large fraction of the total energy consumption in the world comes from heating and cooling of buildings. Improving the energy efficiency of buildings to reduce the needs of seasonal heating and cooling is one of the major challenges in sustainable development. In general, the energy efficiency depends on the geometry and material of the buildings. To explore a framework for accurately assessing this dependence, detailed 3-D thermofluid simulations are performed by systematically sweeping the parameter space spanned by four parameters: the size of building, thickness and material of wall, and fractional size of window. The simulations incorporate realistic ...

Contributors
Jain, Gaurav, Huang, Huei-Ping, Ren, Yi, et al.
Created Date
2016

This study uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate and predict the changes in local climate attributed to the urbanization for five desert cities. The simulations are performed in the fashion of climate downscaling, constrained by the surface boundary conditions generated from high resolution land-use maps. For each city, the land-use maps of 1985 and 2010 from Landsat satellite observation, and a projected land-use map for 2030, are used to represent the past, present, and future. An additional set of simulations for Las Vegas, the largest of the five cities, uses the NLCD 1992 and 2006 land-use ...

Contributors
Kamal, Samy M., Huang, Huei-Ping, Anderson, James, et al.
Created Date
2015

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.