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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




This thesis focuses on sequencing questions in a way that provides students with manageable steps to understand some of the fundamental concepts in discrete mathematics. The questions are aimed at younger students (middle and high school aged) with the goal of helping young students, who have likely never seen discrete mathematics, to learn through guided discovery. Chapter 2 is the bulk of this thesis as it provides questions, hints, solutions, as well as a brief discussion of each question. In the discussions following the questions, I have attempted to illustrate some relationships between the current question and previous questions, explain …

Contributors
Bell, Stephanie, Fishel, Susana, Hurlbert, Glenn, et al.
Created Date
2014

Every graph can be colored with one more color than its maximum degree. A well-known theorem of Brooks gives the precise conditions under which a graph can be colored with maximum degree colors. It is natural to ask for the required conditions on a graph to color with one less color than the maximum degree; in 1977 Borodin and Kostochka conjectured a solution for graphs with maximum degree at least 9: as long as the graph doesn't contain a maximum-degree-sized clique, it can be colored with one fewer than the maximum degree colors. This study attacks the conjecture on multiple …

Contributors
Rabern, Landon, Kierstead, Henry, Colbourn, Charles, et al.
Created Date
2013

Communication networks, both wired and wireless, are expected to have a certain level of fault-tolerance capability.These networks are also expected to ensure a graceful degradation in performance when some of the network components fail. Traditional studies on fault tolerance in communication networks, for the most part, make no assumptions regarding the location of node/link faults, i.e., the faulty nodes and links may be close to each other or far from each other. However, in many real life scenarios, there exists a strong spatial correlation among the faulty nodes and links. Such failures are often encountered in disaster situations, e.g., natural …

Contributors
Banerjee, Sujogya, Sen, Arunabha, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2013

The primary focus of this dissertation lies in extremal combinatorics, in particular intersection theorems in finite set theory. A seminal result in the area is the theorem of Erdos, Ko and Rado which finds the upper bound on the size of an intersecting family of subsets of an n-element set and characterizes the structure of families which attain this upper bound. A major portion of this dissertation focuses on a recent generalization of the Erdos--Ko--Rado theorem which considers intersecting families of independent sets in graphs. An intersection theorem is proved for a large class of graphs, namely chordal graphs which …

Contributors
Kamat, Vikram Mahendra, Hurlbert, Glenn, Colbourn, Charles, et al.
Created Date
2011

Borda's social choice method and Condorcet's social choice method are shown to satisfy different monotonicities and it is shown that it is impossible for any social choice method to satisfy them both. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation are presented which estimate the probability of each of the following social choice methods being manipulable: plurality (first past the post), Borda count, instant runoff, Kemeny-Young, Schulze, and majority Borda. The Kemeny-Young and Schulze methods exhibit the strongest resistance to random manipulability. Two variations of the majority judgment method, with different tie-breaking rules, are compared for continuity. A new variation is proposed …

Contributors
Jennings, Andrew Blake, Hurlbert, Glenn, Barcelo, Helene, et al.
Created Date
2010

A tiling is a collection of vertex disjoint subgraphs called tiles. If the tiles are all isomorphic to a graph $H$ then the tiling is an $H$-tiling. If a graph $G$ has an $H$-tiling which covers all of the vertices of $G$ then the $H$-tiling is a perfect $H$-tiling or an $H$-factor. A goal of this study is to extend theorems on sufficient minimum degree conditions for perfect tilings in graphs to directed graphs. Corrádi and Hajnal proved that every graph $G$ on $3k$ vertices with minimum degree $delta(G)ge2k$ has a $K_3$-factor, where $K_s$ is the complete graph on $s$ …

Contributors
Molla, Theodore, Kierstead, Henry A, Czygrinow, Andrzej, et al.
Created Date
2013

A central concept of combinatorics is partitioning structures with given constraints. Partitions of on-line posets and on-line graphs, which are dynamic versions of the more familiar static structures posets and graphs, are examined. In the on-line setting, vertices are continually added to a poset or graph while a chain partition or coloring (respectively) is maintained. %The optima of the static cases cannot be achieved in the on-line setting. Both upper and lower bounds for the optimum of the number of chains needed to partition a width $w$ on-line poset exist. Kierstead's upper bound of $\frac{5^w-1}{4}$ was improved to $w^{14 \lg …

Contributors
Smith, Matthew Earl, Kierstead, Henry A, Colbourn, Charles, et al.
Created Date
2012

In a large network (graph) it would be desirable to guarantee the existence of some local property based only on global knowledge of the network. Consider the following classical example: how many connections are necessary to guarantee that the network contains three nodes which are pairwise adjacent? It turns out that more than n^2/4 connections are needed, and no smaller number will suffice in general. Problems of this type fall into the category of ``extremal graph theory.'' Generally speaking, extremal graph theory is the study of how global parameters of a graph are related to local properties. This dissertation deals …

Contributors
Debiasio, Louis, Kierstead, Henry A, Czygrinow, Andrzej, et al.
Created Date
2011