Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2020


Protein folding is essential in all cells, and misfolded proteins cause many diseases. In the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, protein folding must be carefully controlled during envelope biogenesis to maintain an effective permeability barrier between the cell and its environment. This study explores the relationship between envelope biogenesis and cell stress, and the return to homeostasis during envelope stress. A major player in envelope biogenesis and stress response is the periplasmic protease DegP. Work presented here explores the growth phenotypes of cells lacking degP, including temperature sensitivity and lowered cell viability. Intriguingly, these cells also accumulate novel cytosolic proteins in …

Contributors
Leiser, Owen Paul, Misra, Rajeev, Jacobs, Bertram, et al.
Created Date
2010

Host organisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to defend against a viral infection and likewise viruses have evolved multiple methods to subvert the host's anti-viral immune response. Vaccinia virus (VACV) is known to contain numerous proteins involved in blocking the cellular anti-viral immune response. The VACV E3L protein is important for inhibiting the anti-viral immune response and deletions within this gene lead to a severe attenuation. In particular, VACV containing N-terminal truncations in E3L are attenuated in animal models and fail to replicate in murine JC cells. Monkeypox virus (MPXV) F3L protein is a homologue of the VACV E3L protein, however …

Contributors
Arndt, William David, Jacobs, Bertram, Curtiss Iii, Roy, et al.
Created Date
2010

Coronaviruses are medically important viruses that cause respiratory and enteric infections in humans and animals. The recent emergence through interspecies transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strongly supports the need for development of vaccines and antiviral reagents. Understanding the molecular details of virus assembly is an attractive target for development of such therapeutics. Coronavirus membrane (M) proteins constitute the bulk of the viral envelope and play key roles in assembly, through M-M, M-spike (S) and M-nucleocapsid (N) interactions. M proteins have three transmembrane domains, flanked by a short amino-terminal domain and a long carboxy-terminal tail located outside and …

Contributors
Arndt, Ariel, Hogue, Brenda G, Jacobs, Bertram, et al.
Created Date
2010

The majority of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and some of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cases are associated with possessing the BCR-Abl fusion protein from an oncogenic translocation, resulting in a constantly active form of Abl and rapid proliferation. CML and ALL cells that possess the BCR-Abl fusion protein are known as Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+). Currently, Imatinib (selective Abl inhibitor) is used as therapy against CML and ALL. However, some patients may have malignancies which show resistance to Imatinib. Previous work displays that the transformation of progenitor B cells with the v-Abl oncogene of Abelson murine leukemia virus results in …

Contributors
Arkus, Nohea Lauae Ananda, Chang, Yung, Kusumi, Kenro, et al.
Created Date
2011

Recombinant protein expression is essential to biotechnology and molecular medicine, but facile methods for obtaining significant quantities of folded and functional protein in mammalian cell culture have been lacking. Here I describe a novel 37-nucleotide in vitro selected sequence that promotes unusually high transgene expression in a vaccinia driven cytoplasmic expression system. Vectors carrying this sequence in a monocistronic reporter plasmid produce >1,000-fold more protein than equivalent vectors with conventional vaccinia promoters. Initial mechanistic studies indicate that high protein expression results from dual activity that impacts both transcription and translation. I suggest that this motif represents a powerful new tool …

Contributors
Flores, Julia Anne, Chaput, John C, Jacobs, Bertram, et al.
Created Date
2012

Cancer is one of the most serious global diseases. We have focused on cancer immunoprevention. My thesis projects include developing a prophylactic primary and metastatic cancer vaccines, early cancer detection and investigation of genes involved in tumor development. These studies were focused on frame-shift (FS) antigens. The FS antigens are generated by genomic mutations or abnormal RNA processing, which cause a portion of a normal protein to be translated out of frame. The concept of the prophylactic cancer vaccine is to develop a general cancer vaccine that could prevent healthy people from developing different types of cancer. We have discovered …

Contributors
Shen, Luhui, Johnston, Stephen Albert, Chang, Yung, et al.
Created Date
2012

The advent of new high throughput technology allows for increasingly detailed characterization of the immune system in healthy, disease, and age states. The immune system is composed of two main branches: the innate and adaptive immune system, though the border between these two states is appearing less distinct. The adaptive immune system is further split into two main categories: humoral and cellular immunity. The humoral immune response produces antibodies against specific targets, and these antibodies can be used to learn about disease and normal states. In this document, I use antibodies to characterize the immune system in two ways: 1. …

Contributors
Whittemore, Kurt, Sykes, Kathryn, Johnston, Stephen A, et al.
Created Date
2014

This study aims to unearth monological and monocultural discourses buried under the power of the dominant biomedical model governing the HIV/AIDS debate. The study responds to an apparent consensus, rooted in Western biomedicine and its "standardizations of knowledge," in the production of the current HIV/AIDS discourse, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. As a result, biomedicine has become the dominant actor (in) writing and rewriting discourse for the masses while marginalizing other forms of medical knowledge. Specifically, in its development, the Western biomedical model has arguably isolated the disease from its human host and the social experiences that facilitate the disease's transmission, …

Contributors
Abdalla, Mohamed Abdirazak, Jacobs, Bertram, Robert, Jason, et al.
Created Date
2014

Peptide microarrays are to proteomics as sequencing is to genomics. As microarrays become more content-rich, higher resolution proteomic studies will parallel deep sequencing of nucleic acids. Antigen-antibody interactions can be studied at a much higher resolution using microarrays than was possible only a decade ago. My dissertation focuses on testing the feasibility of using either the Immunosignature platform, based on non-natural peptide sequences, or a pathogen peptide microarray, which uses bioinformatically-selected peptides from pathogens for creating sensitive diagnostics. Both diagnostic applications use relatively little serum from infected individuals, but each approaches diagnosis of disease differently. The first project compares pathogen …

Contributors
Navalkar, Krupa Arun, Johnston, Stephen A, Stafford, Phillip, et al.
Created Date
2014

Vaccination remains one of the most effective means for preventing infectious diseases. During viral infection, activated CD8 T cells differentiate into cytotoxic effector cells that directly kill infected cells and produce anti-viral cytokines. Further T cell differentiation results in a population of memory CD8 T cells that have the ability to self-renew and rapidly proliferate into effector cells during secondary infections. However during persistent viral infection, T cell differentiation is disrupted due to sustained antigen stimulation resulting in a loss of T cell effector function. Despite the development of vaccines for a wide range of viral diseases, efficacious vaccines for …

Contributors
McAfee, Megan S., Blattman, Joseph N, Anderson, Karen, et al.
Created Date
2015