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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2018


As the information available to lay users through autonomous data sources continues to increase, mediators become important to ensure that the wealth of information available is tapped effectively. A key challenge that these information mediators need to handle is the varying levels of incompleteness in the underlying databases in terms of missing attribute values. Existing approaches such as Query Processing over Incomplete Autonomous Databases (QPIAD) aim to mine and use Approximate Functional Dependencies (AFDs) to predict and retrieve relevant incomplete tuples. These approaches make independence assumptions about missing values--which critically hobbles their performance when there are tuples containing missing values ...

Contributors
Raghunathan, Rohit, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2011

Automated planning addresses the problem of generating a sequence of actions that enable a set of agents to achieve their goals.This work investigates two important topics from the field of automated planning, namely model-lite planning and multi-agent planning. For model-lite planning, I focus on a prominent model named Annotated PDDL and it's related application of robust planning. For this model, I try to identify a method of leveraging additional domain information (available in the form of successful plan traces). I use this information to refine the set of possible domains to generate more robust plans (as compared to the original ...

Contributors
Sreedharan, Sarath, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Zhang, Yu, et al.
Created Date
2016

Different logic-based knowledge representation formalisms have different limitations either with respect to expressivity or with respect to computational efficiency. First-order logic, which is the basis of Description Logics (DLs), is not suitable for defeasible reasoning due to its monotonic nature. The nonmonotonic formalisms that extend first-order logic, such as circumscription and default logic, are expressive but lack efficient implementations. The nonmonotonic formalisms that are based on the declarative logic programming approach, such as Answer Set Programming (ASP), have efficient implementations but are not expressive enough for representing and reasoning with open domains. This dissertation uses the first-order stable model semantics, ...

Contributors
Palla, Ravi Kiran Reddy, Lee, Joohyung, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2012

Although current urban search and rescue (USAR) robots are little more than remotely controlled cameras, the end goal is for them to work alongside humans as trusted teammates. Natural language communications and performance data are collected as a team of humans works to carry out a simulated search and rescue task in an uncertain virtual environment. Conditions are tested emulating a remotely controlled robot versus an intelligent one. Differences in performance, situation awareness, trust, workload, and communications are measured. The Intelligent robot condition resulted in higher levels of performance and operator situation awareness (SA). Dissertation/Thesis

Contributors
Bartlett, Cade Earl, Cooke, Nancy J, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2015

In most social networking websites, users are allowed to perform interactive activities. One of the fundamental features that these sites provide is to connecting with users of their kind. On one hand, this activity makes online connections visible and tangible; on the other hand, it enables the exploration of our connections and the expansion of our social networks easier. The aggregation of people who share common interests forms social groups, which are fundamental parts of our social lives. Social behavioral analysis at a group level is an active research area and attracts many interests from the industry. Challenges of my ...

Contributors
Wang, Xufei, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2013

Exabytes of data are created online every day. This deluge of data is no more apparent than it is on social media. Naturally, finding ways to leverage this unprecedented source of human information is an active area of research. Social media platforms have become laboratories for conducting experiments about people at scales thought unimaginable only a few years ago. Researchers and practitioners use social media to extract actionable patterns such as where aid should be distributed in a crisis. However, the validity of these patterns relies on having a representative dataset. As this dissertation shows, the data collected from social ...

Contributors
Morstatter, Fred, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2017

Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and blogs have emerged as valuable - in fact, the de facto - virtual town halls for people to discover, report, share and communicate with others about various types of events. These events range from widely-known events such as the U.S Presidential debate to smaller scale, local events such as a local Halloween block party. During these events, we often witness a large amount of commentary contributed by crowds on social media. This burst of social media responses surges with the "second-screen" behavior and greatly enriches the user experience when interacting with the ...

Contributors
Hu, Yuheng, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Horvitz, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2014

Building computational models of human problem solving has been a longstanding goal in Artificial Intelligence research. The theories of cognitive architectures addressed this issue by embedding models of problem solving within them. This thesis presents an extended account of human problem solving and describes its implementation within one such theory of cognitive architecture--ICARUS. The document begins by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next it discusses some limitations of the existing mechanism and proposes four extensions that eliminate these limitations, elaborate the framework along interesting dimensions, ...

Contributors
Trivedi, Nishant H., Langley, Patrick W, Vanlehn, Kurt, et al.
Created Date
2011

Humans and robots need to work together as a team to accomplish certain shared goals due to the limitations of current robot capabilities. Human assistance is required to accomplish the tasks as human capabilities are often better suited for certain tasks and they complement robot capabilities in many situations. Given the necessity of human-robot teams, it has been long assumed that for the robotic agent to be an effective team member, it must be equipped with automated planning technologies that helps in achieving the goals that have been delegated to it by their human teammates as well as in deducing ...

Contributors
Narayanan, Vignesh, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Zhang, Yu, et al.
Created Date
2015

Browsing Twitter users, or browsers, often find it increasingly cumbersome to attach meaning to tweets that are displayed on their timeline as they follow more and more users or pages. The tweets being browsed are created by Twitter users called originators, and are of some significance to the browser who has chosen to subscribe to the tweets from the originator by following the originator. Although, hashtags are used to tag tweets in an effort to attach context to the tweets, many tweets do not have a hashtag. Such tweets are called orphan tweets and they adversely affect the experience of ...

Contributors
Mallapura Umamaheshwar, Tejas, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2015