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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2019


This work explores the application and optimization of laser patterning of dielectrics on textured crystalline silicon for improving the performance of industrial silicon solar cells. Current direct laser patterning processes introduce defects to the surface of the solar cell as a result of the film transparency and the intensity variation of the laser induced by the textured surface. As a means of overcoming these challenges, a co-deposited protective masking film was developed that is directly patterned with laser light at greatly depreciated light intensities that allows for selective chemical etching of the underlying dielectric films without incurring substantial defects to …

Contributors
Bailly, Mark, Bowden, Stuart G, King, Richard R, et al.
Created Date
2018

ABSTRACT Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology uses the mechanism of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes and electrochemical redox reactions to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias is applied from anode to cathode, atoms at the anode are oxidized to ions and dissolve in the solid electrolyte. They travel to the cathode under the influence of an electric field, where they are reduced to form electrodeposits. These electrodeposits are filamentary in nature and grow in different patterns. Devices that make use of the principle of filament growth have applications in memory, RF switching, and hardware security. The solid electrolyte …

Contributors
Krishnan, Anand, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh J, et al.
Created Date
2019

Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a resistance-switching device based on migration of nanoscale quantities of cations in a solid electrolyte and formation of a conducting electrodeposit by the reductions of these cations. This dissertation presents electrical characterization results on Cu-SiO2 based PMC devices, which due to the na- ture of materials can be easily integrated into the current Complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process line. Device structures representing individual mem- ory cells based on W bottom electrode and n-type Si bottom electrode were fabricated for characterization. For the W bottom electrode based devices, switching was ob- served for voltages in …

Contributors
Puthenthermadam, Sarath, Kozicki, Michael N, Diaz, Rodolfo, et al.
Created Date
2011

The Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a novel solid-state resistive switching technology. It has a simple metal-insulator-metal “MIM” structure with one metal being electrochemically active (Cu) and the other one being inert (Pt or W), an insulating film (silica) acts as solid electrolyte for ion transport is sandwiched between these two electrodes. PMC’s resistance can be altered by an external electrical stimulus. The change of resistance is attributed to the formation or dissolution of Cu metal filament(s) within the silica layer which is associated with electrochemical redox reactions and ion transportation. In this dissertation, a comprehensive study of microfabrication method …

Contributors
Chen, Wenhao, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh J, et al.
Created Date
2017

High-k dielectrics have been employed in the metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) since 45 nm technology node. In this MOSFET industry, Moore’s law projects the feature size of MOSFET scales half within every 18 months. Such scaling down theory has not only led to the physical limit of manufacturing but also raised the reliability issues in MOSFETs. After the incorporation of HfO2 based high-k dielectrics, the stacked oxides based gate insulator is facing rather challenging reliability issues due to the vulnerable HfO2 layer, ultra-thin interfacial SiO2 layer, and even messy interface between SiO2 and HfO2. Bias temperature instabilities (BTI), …

Contributors
Fang, Runchen, Barnaby, Hugh J, Kozicki, Michael N, et al.
Created Date
2018

The field of flexible displays and electronics gained a big momentum within the recent years due to their ruggedness, thinness, and flexibility as well as low cost large area manufacturability. Amorphous silicon has been the dominant material used in the thin film transistor industry which could only utilize it as N type thin film transistors (TFT). Amorphous silicon is an unstable material for low temperature manufacturing process and having only one kind of transistor means high power consumption for circuit operations. This thesis covers the three major researches done on flexible TFTs and flexible electronic circuits. First the characterization of …

Contributors
Kaftanoglu, Korhan, Allee, David R, Kozicki, Michael N, et al.
Created Date
2012

Total dose sensing systems (or radiation detection systems) have many applications, ranging from survey monitors used to supervise the generated radioactive waste at nuclear power plants to personal dosimeters which measure the radiation dose accumulated in individuals. This dissertation work will present two different types of novel devices developed at Arizona State University for total dose sensing applications. The first detector technology is a mechanically flexible metal-chalcogenide glass (ChG) based system which is fabricated on low cost substrates and are intended as disposable total dose sensors. Compared to existing commercial technologies, these thin film radiation sensors are simpler in form …

Contributors
Mahmud, Adnan, Barnaby, Hugh J., Kozicki, Michael N, et al.
Created Date
2017

Programmable metallization cell (PMC) technology employs the mechanisms of metal ion transport in solid electrolytes (SE) and electrochemical redox reactions in order to form metallic electrodeposits. When a positive bias is applied to an anode opposite to a cathode, atoms at the anode are oxidized to ions and dissolve into the SE. Under the influence of the electric field, the ions move to the cathode and become reduced to form the electrodeposits. These electrodeposits are filamentary in nature and persistent, and since they are metallic can alter the physical characteristics of the material on which they are formed. PMCs can …

Contributors
Yu, Weijie, Kozicki, Michael N, Barnaby, Hugh, et al.
Created Date
2015

This PhD thesis consists of three main themes. The first part focusses on modeling of Silver (Ag)-Chalcogenide glass based resistive memory devices known as the Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC). The proposed models are examined with the Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations. In order to find a relationship between electrochemistry and carrier-trap statistics in chalcogenide glass films, an analytical mapping for electron trapping is derived. Then, a physical-based model is proposed in order to explain the dynamic behavior of the photodoping mechanism in lateral PMCs. At the end, in order to extract the time constant of ChG materials, a method …

Contributors
Saremi, Mehdi, Goodnick, Stephen M, Vasileska, Dragica, et al.
Created Date
2017

Electronic devices are gaining an increasing market share in the medical field. Medical devices are becoming more sophisticated, and encompassing more applications. Unlike consumer electronics, medical devices have far more limitations when it comes to area, power and most importantly reliability. The medical devices industry has recently seen the advantages of using Flash memory instead of Read Only Memory (ROM) for firmware storage, and in some cases to replace Electrically Programmable Read Only Memories (EEPROMs) in medical devices for frequent data storage. There are direct advantages to using Flash memory instead of Read Only Memory, most importantly the fact that …

Contributors
Hag, Eslam E., Kozicki, Michael N, Schroder, Dieter K, et al.
Created Date
2010