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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Microbial electrochemical cells (MXCs) are promising platforms for bioenergy production from renewable resources. In these systems, specialized anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) deliver electrons from oxidation of organic substrates to the anode of an MXC. While much progress has been made in understanding the microbiology, physiology, and electrochemistry of well-studied model ARB such as Geobacter and Shewanella, tremendous potential exists for MXCs as microbiological platforms for exploring novel ARB. This dissertation introduces approaches for selective enrichment and characterization of phototrophic, halophilic, and alkaliphilic ARB. An enrichment scheme based on manipulation of poised anode potential, light, and nutrient availability led to current generation …

Contributors
Badalamenti, Jonathan Paul, Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa, Garcia-Pichel, Ferran, et al.
Created Date
2013

Biological soil crusts (BSCs), topsoil microbial assemblages typical of arid land ecosystems, provide essential ecosystem services such as soil fertilization and stabilization against erosion. Cyanobacteria and lichens, sometimes mosses, drive BSC as primary producers, but metabolic activity is restricted to periods of hydration associated with precipitation. Climate models for the SW United States predict changes in precipitation frequency as a major outcome of global warming, even if models differ on the sign and magnitude of the change. BSC organisms are clearly well adapted to withstand desiccation and prolonged drought, but it is unknown if and how an alteration of the …

Contributors
Myers, Natalie Kristine, Garcia-Pichel, Ferran, Hall, Sharon, et al.
Created Date
2013