ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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The study of acoustic ecology is concerned with the manner in which life interacts with its environment as mediated through sound. As such, a central focus is that of the soundscape: the acoustic environment as perceived by a listener. This dissertation examines the application of several computational tools in the realms of digital signal processing, multimedia information retrieval, and computer music synthesis to the analysis of the soundscape. Namely, these tools include a) an open source software library, Sirens, which can be used for the segmentation of long environmental field recordings into individual sonic events and compare these events in ...

Contributors
Mechtley, Brandon, Spanias, Andreas S, Sundaram, Hari, et al.
Created Date
2013

Software has a great impact on the energy efficiency of any computing system--it can manage the components of a system efficiently or inefficiently. The impact of software is amplified in the context of a wearable computing system used for activity recognition. The design space this platform opens up is immense and encompasses sensors, feature calculations, activity classification algorithms, sleep schedules, and transmission protocols. Design choices in each of these areas impact energy use, overall accuracy, and usefulness of the system. This thesis explores methods software can influence the trade-off between energy consumption and system accuracy. In general the more energy ...

Contributors
Boyd, Jeffrey, Sundaram, Hari, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2014

We solve the problem of activity verification in the context of sustainability. Activity verification is the process of proving the user assertions pertaining to a certain activity performed by the user. Our motivation lies in incentivizing the user for engaging in sustainable activities like taking public transport or recycling. Such incentivization schemes require the system to verify the claim made by the user. The system verifies these claims by analyzing the supporting evidence captured by the user while performing the activity. The proliferation of portable smart-phones in the past few years has provided us with a ubiquitous and relatively cheap ...

Contributors
Desai, Vaishnav Jagannath, Sundaram, Hari, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2013

Bridging semantic gap is one of the fundamental problems in multimedia computing and pattern recognition. The challenge of associating low-level signal with their high-level semantic interpretation is mainly due to the fact that semantics are often conveyed implicitly in a context, relying on interactions among multiple levels of concepts or low-level data entities. Also, additional domain knowledge may often be indispensable for uncovering the underlying semantics, but in most cases such domain knowledge is not readily available from the acquired media streams. Thus, making use of various types of contextual information and leveraging corresponding domain knowledge are vital for effectively ...

Contributors
Wang, Zheshen, Li, Baoxin, Sundaram, Hari, et al.
Created Date
2011

Advances in the area of ubiquitous, pervasive and wearable computing have resulted in the development of low band-width, data rich environmental and body sensor networks, providing a reliable and non-intrusive methodology for capturing activity data from humans and the environments they inhabit. Assistive technologies that promote independent living amongst elderly and individuals with cognitive impairment are a major motivating factor for sensor-based activity recognition systems. However, the process of discerning relevant activity information from these sensor streams such as accelerometers is a non-trivial task and is an on-going research area. The difficulty stems from factors such as spatio-temporal variations in ...

Contributors
Chatapuram Krishnan, Narayanan, Panchanathan, Sethuraman, Sundaram, Hari, et al.
Created Date
2010

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.