ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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In recent years, several methods have been proposed to encode sentences into fixed length continuous vectors called sentence representation or sentence embedding. With the recent advancements in various deep learning methods applied in Natural Language Processing (NLP), these representations play a crucial role in tasks such as named entity recognition, question answering and sentence classification. Traditionally, sentence vector representations are learnt from its constituent word representations, also known as word embeddings. Various methods to learn the distributed representation (embedding) of words have been proposed using the notion of Distributional Semantics, i.e. “meaning of a word is characterized by the company ...

Contributors
Rath, Trideep, Baral, Chitta, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2017

Compressive sensing theory allows to sense and reconstruct signals/images with lower sampling rate than Nyquist rate. Applications in resource constrained environment stand to benefit from this theory, opening up many possibilities for new applications at the same time. The traditional inference pipeline for computer vision sequence reconstructing the image from compressive measurements. However,the reconstruction process is a computationally expensive step that also provides poor results at high compression rate. There have been several successful attempts to perform inference tasks directly on compressive measurements such as activity recognition. In this thesis, I am interested to tackle a more challenging vision problem ...

Contributors
Huang, Li-chi, Turaga, Pavan, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2017

Visual Question Answering (VQA) is a new research area involving technologies ranging from computer vision, natural language processing, to other sub-fields of artificial intelligence such as knowledge representation. The fundamental task is to take as input one image and one question (in text) related to the given image, and to generate a textual answer to the input question. There are two key research problems in VQA: image understanding and the question answering. My research mainly focuses on developing solutions to support solving these two problems. In image understanding, one important research area is semantic segmentation, which takes images as input ...

Contributors
Tian, Qiongjie, Li, Baoxin, Tong, Hanghang, et al.
Created Date
2017

Light field imaging is limited in its computational processing demands of high sampling for both spatial and angular dimensions. Single-shot light field cameras sacrifice spatial resolution to sample angular viewpoints, typically by multiplexing incoming rays onto a 2D sensor array. While this resolution can be recovered using compressive sensing, these iterative solutions are slow in processing a light field. We present a deep learning approach using a new, two branch network architecture, consisting jointly of an autoencoder and a 4D CNN, to recover a high resolution 4D light field from a single coded 2D image. This network decreases reconstruction time ...

Contributors
Gupta, Mayank, Turaga, Pavan, Yang, Yezhou, et al.
Created Date
2017

In this thesis, I propose a new technique of Aligning English sentence words with its Semantic Representation using Inductive Logic Programming(ILP). My work focusses on Abstract Meaning Representation(AMR). AMR is a semantic formalism to English natural language. It encodes meaning of a sentence in a rooted graph. This representation has gained attention for its simplicity and expressive power. An AMR Aligner aligns words in a sentence to nodes(concepts) in its AMR graph. As AMR annotation has no explicit alignment with words in English sentence, automatic alignment becomes a requirement for training AMR parsers. The aligner in this work comprises of ...

Contributors
Agarwal, Shubham, Baral, Chitta, Li, Baoxin, et al.
Created Date
2017

This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries.

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