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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Date Range
2010 2017


As the information available to lay users through autonomous data sources continues to increase, mediators become important to ensure that the wealth of information available is tapped effectively. A key challenge that these information mediators need to handle is the varying levels of incompleteness in the underlying databases in terms of missing attribute values. Existing approaches such as Query Processing over Incomplete Autonomous Databases (QPIAD) aim to mine and use Approximate Functional Dependencies (AFDs) to predict and retrieve relevant incomplete tuples. These approaches make independence assumptions about missing values--which critically hobbles their performance when there are tuples containing missing values …

Contributors
Raghunathan, Rohit, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2011

In most social networking websites, users are allowed to perform interactive activities. One of the fundamental features that these sites provide is to connecting with users of their kind. On one hand, this activity makes online connections visible and tangible; on the other hand, it enables the exploration of our connections and the expansion of our social networks easier. The aggregation of people who share common interests forms social groups, which are fundamental parts of our social lives. Social behavioral analysis at a group level is an active research area and attracts many interests from the industry. Challenges of my …

Contributors
Wang, Xufei, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2013

Exabytes of data are created online every day. This deluge of data is no more apparent than it is on social media. Naturally, finding ways to leverage this unprecedented source of human information is an active area of research. Social media platforms have become laboratories for conducting experiments about people at scales thought unimaginable only a few years ago. Researchers and practitioners use social media to extract actionable patterns such as where aid should be distributed in a crisis. However, the validity of these patterns relies on having a representative dataset. As this dissertation shows, the data collected from social …

Contributors
Morstatter, Fred, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2017

Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and blogs have emerged as valuable - in fact, the de facto - virtual town halls for people to discover, report, share and communicate with others about various types of events. These events range from widely-known events such as the U.S Presidential debate to smaller scale, local events such as a local Halloween block party. During these events, we often witness a large amount of commentary contributed by crowds on social media. This burst of social media responses surges with the "second-screen" behavior and greatly enriches the user experience when interacting with the …

Contributors
Hu, Yuheng, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Horvitz, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2014

Browsing Twitter users, or browsers, often find it increasingly cumbersome to attach meaning to tweets that are displayed on their timeline as they follow more and more users or pages. The tweets being browsed are created by Twitter users called originators, and are of some significance to the browser who has chosen to subscribe to the tweets from the originator by following the originator. Although, hashtags are used to tag tweets in an effort to attach context to the tweets, many tweets do not have a hashtag. Such tweets are called orphan tweets and they adversely affect the experience of …

Contributors
Mallapura Umamaheshwar, Tejas, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Liu, Huan, et al.
Created Date
2015

With the rise of social media, user-generated content has become available at an unprecedented scale. On Twitter, 1 billion tweets are posted every 5 days and on Facebook, 20 million links are shared every 20 minutes. These massive collections of user-generated content have introduced the human behavior's big-data. This big data has brought about countless opportunities for analyzing human behavior at scale. However, is this data enough? Unfortunately, the data available at the individual-level is limited for most users. This limited individual-level data is often referred to as thin data. Hence, researchers face a big-data paradox, where this big-data is …

Contributors
Zafarani, Reza, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2015

Social networking services have emerged as an important platform for large-scale information sharing and communication. With the growing popularity of social media, spamming has become rampant in the platforms. Complex network interactions and evolving content present great challenges for social spammer detection. Different from some existing well-studied platforms, distinct characteristics of newly emerged social media data present new challenges for social spammer detection. First, texts in social media are short and potentially linked with each other via user connections. Second, it is observed that abundant contextual information may play an important role in distinguishing social spammers and normal users. Third, …

Contributors
Hu, Xia, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2015

As robotic technology and its various uses grow steadily more complex and ubiquitous, humans are coming into increasing contact with robotic agents. A large portion of such contact is cooperative interaction, where both humans and robots are required to work on the same application towards achieving common goals. These application scenarios are characterized by a need to leverage the strengths of each agent as part of a unified team to reach those common goals. To ensure that the robotic agent is truly a contributing team-member, it must exhibit some degree of autonomy in achieving goals that have been delegated to …

Contributors
Talamadupula, Kartik, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Baral, Chitta, et al.
Created Date
2014

The increasing popularity of Twitter renders improved trustworthiness and relevance assessment of tweets much more important for search. However, given the limitations on the size of tweets, it is hard to extract measures for ranking from the tweet's content alone. I propose a method of ranking tweets by generating a reputation score for each tweet that is based not just on content, but also additional information from the Twitter ecosystem that consists of users, tweets, and the web pages that tweets link to. This information is obtained by modeling the Twitter ecosystem as a three-layer graph. The reputation score is …

Contributors
Ravikumar, Srijith, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2013

Goal specification is an important aspect of designing autonomous agents. A goal does not only refer to the set of states for the agent to reach. A goal also defines restrictions on the paths the agent should follow. Temporal logics are widely used in goal specification. However, they lack the ability to represent goals in a non-deterministic domain, goals that change non-monotonically, and goals with preferences. This dissertation defines new goal specification languages by extending temporal logics to address these issues. First considered is the goal specification in non-deterministic domains, in which an agent following a policy leads to a …

Contributors
Zhao, Jicheng, Baral, Chitta, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2010