Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Exabytes of data are created online every day. This deluge of data is no more apparent than it is on social media. Naturally, finding ways to leverage this unprecedented source of human information is an active area of research. Social media platforms have become laboratories for conducting experiments about people at scales thought unimaginable only a few years ago. Researchers and practitioners use social media to extract actionable patterns such as where aid should be distributed in a crisis. However, the validity of these patterns relies on having a representative dataset. As this dissertation shows, the data collected from social …

Contributors
Morstatter, Fred, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2017

Predictive analytics embraces an extensive area of techniques from statistical modeling to machine learning to data mining and is applied in business intelligence, public health, disaster management and response, and many other fields. To date, visualization has been broadly used to support tasks in the predictive analytics pipeline under the underlying assumption that a human-in-the-loop can aid the analysis by integrating domain knowledge that might not be broadly captured by the system. Primary uses of visualization in the predictive analytics pipeline have focused on data cleaning, exploratory analysis, and diagnostics. More recently, numerous visual analytics systems for feature selection, incremental …

Contributors
Lu, Yafeng, Maciejewski, Ross, Cooke, Nancy, et al.
Created Date
2017

Crises or large-scale emergencies such as earthquakes and hurricanes cause massive damage to lives and property. Crisis response is an essential task to mitigate the impact of a crisis. An effective response to a crisis necessitates information gathering and analysis. Traditionally, this process has been restricted to the information collected by first responders on the ground in the affected region or by official agencies such as local governments involved in the response. However, the ubiquity of mobile devices has empowered people to publish information during a crisis through social media, such as the damage reports from a hurricane. Social media …

Contributors
Kumar, Shamanth, Liu, Huan, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2015

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries and relate domain knowledge about underlying geographical phenomena that would not be apparent in tabular form. However, several critical challenges arise when visualizing and exploring these large spatiotemporal datasets. While, the underlying geographical component of the data lends itself well to univariate visualization in the form of traditional cartographic representations (e.g., choropleth, isopleth, dasymetric maps), as the data becomes multivariate, …

Contributors
Zhang, Yifan, Maciejewski, Ross, Mack, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2016