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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




A myriad of social media services are emerging in recent years that allow people to communicate and express themselves conveniently and easily. The pervasive use of social media generates massive data at an unprecedented rate. It becomes increasingly difficult for online users to find relevant information or, in other words, exacerbates the information overload problem. Meanwhile, users in social media can be both passive content consumers and active content producers, causing the quality of user-generated content can vary dramatically from excellence to abuse or spam, which results in a problem of information credibility. Trust, providing evidence about with whom users …

Contributors
Tang, Jiliang, Liu, Huan, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2015

With the rise of social media, user-generated content has become available at an unprecedented scale. On Twitter, 1 billion tweets are posted every 5 days and on Facebook, 20 million links are shared every 20 minutes. These massive collections of user-generated content have introduced the human behavior's big-data. This big data has brought about countless opportunities for analyzing human behavior at scale. However, is this data enough? Unfortunately, the data available at the individual-level is limited for most users. This limited individual-level data is often referred to as thin data. Hence, researchers face a big-data paradox, where this big-data is …

Contributors
Zafarani, Reza, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2015

Models using feature interactions have been applied successfully in many areas such as biomedical analysis, recommender systems. The popularity of using feature interactions mainly lies in (1) they are able to capture the nonlinearity of the data compared with linear effects and (2) they enjoy great interpretability. In this thesis, I propose a series of formulations using feature interactions for real world problems and develop efficient algorithms for solving them. Specifically, I first propose to directly solve the non-convex formulation of the weak hierarchical Lasso which imposes weak hierarchy on individual features and interactions but can only be approximately solved …

Contributors
Liu, Yashu, Ye, Jieping, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2018

Multi-task learning (MTL) aims to improve the generalization performance (of the resulting classifiers) by learning multiple related tasks simultaneously. Specifically, MTL exploits the intrinsic task relatedness, based on which the informative domain knowledge from each task can be shared across multiple tasks and thus facilitate the individual task learning. It is particularly desirable to share the domain knowledge (among the tasks) when there are a number of related tasks but only limited training data is available for each task. Modeling the relationship of multiple tasks is critical to the generalization performance of the MTL algorithms. In this dissertation, I propose …

Contributors
Chen, Jianhui, Ye, Jieping, Kumar, Sudhir, et al.
Created Date
2011

The rapid growth in the high-throughput technologies last few decades makes the manual processing of the generated data to be impracticable. Even worse, the machine learning and data mining techniques seemed to be paralyzed against these massive datasets. High-dimensionality is one of the most common challenges for machine learning and data mining tasks. Feature selection aims to reduce dimensionality by selecting a small subset of the features that perform at least as good as the full feature set. Generally, the learning performance, e.g. classification accuracy, and algorithm complexity are used to measure the quality of the algorithm. Recently, the stability …

Contributors
Alelyani, Salem, Liu, Huan, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2013

The rapid urban expansion has greatly extended the physical boundary of our living area, along with a large number of POIs (points of interest) being developed. A POI is a specific location (e.g., hotel, restaurant, theater, mall) that a user may find useful or interesting. When exploring the city and neighborhood, the increasing number of POIs could enrich people's daily life, providing them with more choices of life experience than before, while at the same time also brings the problem of "curse of choices", resulting in the difficulty for a user to make a satisfied decision on "where to go" …

Contributors
Gao, Huiji, Liu, Huan, Xue, Guoliang, et al.
Created Date
2014

Discriminative learning when training and test data belong to different distributions is a challenging and complex task. Often times we have very few or no labeled data from the test or target distribution, but we may have plenty of labeled data from one or multiple related sources with different distributions. Due to its capability of migrating knowledge from related domains, transfer learning has shown to be effective for cross-domain learning problems. In this dissertation, I carry out research along this direction with a particular focus on designing efficient and effective algorithms for BioImaging and Bilingual applications. Specifically, I propose deep …

Contributors
Sun, Qian, Ye, Jieping, Ye, Jieping, et al.
Created Date
2015