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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and blogs have emerged as valuable - in fact, the de facto - virtual town halls for people to discover, report, share and communicate with others about various types of events. These events range from widely-known events such as the U.S Presidential debate to smaller scale, local events such as a local Halloween block party. During these events, we often witness a large amount of commentary contributed by crowds on social media. This burst of social media responses surges with the "second-screen" behavior and greatly enriches the user experience when interacting with the …

Contributors
Hu, Yuheng, Kambhampati, Subbarao, Horvitz, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2014

A statement appearing in social media provides a very significant challenge for determining the provenance of the statement. Provenance describes the origin, custody, and ownership of something. Most statements appearing in social media are not published with corresponding provenance data. However, the same characteristics that make the social media environment challenging, including the massive amounts of data available, large numbers of users, and a highly dynamic environment, provide unique and untapped opportunities for solving the provenance problem for social media. Current approaches for tracking provenance data do not scale for online social media and consequently there is a gap in …

Contributors
Barbier, Geoffrey, Liu, Huan, Bell, Herbert, et al.
Created Date
2011

Contemporary online social platforms present individuals with social signals in the form of news feed on their peers' activities. On networks such as Facebook, Quora, network operator decides how that information is shown to an individual. Then the user, with her own interests and resource constraints selectively acts on a subset of items presented to her. The network operator again, shows that activity to a selection of peers, and thus creating a behavioral loop. That mechanism of interaction and information flow raises some very interesting questions such as: can network operator design social signals to promote a particular activity like …

Contributors
Le, Tien Dinh, Sundaram, Hari, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Sarcasm is a nuanced form of language where usually, the speaker explicitly states the opposite of what is implied. Imbued with intentional ambiguity and subtlety, detecting sarcasm is a difficult task, even for humans. Current works approach this challenging problem primarily from a linguistic perspective, focusing on the lexical and syntactic aspects of sarcasm. In this thesis, I explore the possibility of using behavior traits intrinsic to users of sarcasm to detect sarcastic tweets. First, I theorize the core forms of sarcasm using findings from the psychological and behavioral sciences, and some observations on Twitter users. Then, I develop computational …

Contributors
Rajadesingan, Ashwin, Liu, Huan, Kambhampati, Subbarao, et al.
Created Date
2014