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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


In this thesis, the application of pixel-based vertical axes used within parallel coordinate plots is explored in an attempt to improve how existing tools can explain complex multivariate interactions across temporal data. Several promising visualization techniques are combined, such as: visual boosting to allow for quicker consumption of large data sets, the bond energy algorithm to find finer patterns and anomalies through contrast, multi-dimensional scaling, flow lines, user guided clustering, and row-column ordering. User input is applied on precomputed data sets to provide for real time interaction. General applicability of the techniques are tested against industrial trade, social networking, financial, …

Contributors
Hayden, Thomas, Maciejewski, Ross, Wang, Yalin, et al.
Created Date
2014

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries and relate domain knowledge about underlying geographical phenomena that would not be apparent in tabular form. However, several critical challenges arise when visualizing and exploring these large spatiotemporal datasets. While, the underlying geographical component of the data lends itself well to univariate visualization in the form of traditional cartographic representations (e.g., choropleth, isopleth, dasymetric maps), as the data becomes multivariate, …

Contributors
Zhang, Yifan, Maciejewski, Ross, Mack, Elizabeth, et al.
Created Date
2016

Predictive analytics embraces an extensive area of techniques from statistical modeling to machine learning to data mining and is applied in business intelligence, public health, disaster management and response, and many other fields. To date, visualization has been broadly used to support tasks in the predictive analytics pipeline under the underlying assumption that a human-in-the-loop can aid the analysis by integrating domain knowledge that might not be broadly captured by the system. Primary uses of visualization in the predictive analytics pipeline have focused on data cleaning, exploratory analysis, and diagnostics. More recently, numerous visual analytics systems for feature selection, incremental …

Contributors
Lu, Yafeng, Maciejewski, Ross, Cooke, Nancy, et al.
Created Date
2017

The connections between different entities define different kinds of networks, and many such networked phenomena are influenced by their underlying geographical relationships. By integrating network and geospatial analysis, the goal is to extract information about interaction topologies and the relationships to related geographical constructs. In the recent decades, much work has been done analyzing the dynamics of spatial networks; however, many challenges still remain in this field. First, the development of social media and transportation technologies has greatly reshaped the typologies of communications between different geographical regions. Second, the distance metrics used in spatial analysis should also be enriched with …

Contributors
Wang, Feng, Maciejewski, Ross, Davulcu, Hasan, et al.
Created Date
2017

When looking at drawings of graphs, questions about graph density, community structures, local clustering and other graph properties may be of critical importance for analysis. While graph layout algorithms have focused on minimizing edge crossing, symmetry, and other such layout properties, there is not much known about how these algorithms relate to a user’s ability to perceive graph properties for a given graph layout. This study applies previously established methodologies for perceptual analysis to identify which graph drawing layout will help the user best perceive a particular graph property. A large scale (n = 588) crowdsourced experiment is conducted to …

Contributors
Soni, Utkarsh, Maciejewski, Ross, Kobourov, Stephen, et al.
Created Date
2018