Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


In a 2004 paper, John Nagy raised the possibility of the existence of a hypertumor \emph{i.e.}, a focus of aggressively reproducing parenchyma cells that invade part or all of a tumor. His model used a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations to find a suitable set of conditions for which these hypertumors exist. Here that model is expanded by transforming it into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations with diffusion, advection, and a free boundary condition to represent a radially symmetric tumor growth. Two strains of parenchymal cells are incorporated; one forming almost the entirety of the tumor while ...

Contributors
Alvarez, Roberto, Milner, Fabio A, Nagy, John D, et al.
Created Date
2014

The tools developed for the use of investigating dynamical systems have provided critical understanding to a wide range of physical phenomena. Here these tools are used to gain further insight into scalar transport, and how it is affected by mixing. The aim of this research is to investigate the efficiency of several different partitioning methods which demarcate flow fields into dynamically distinct regions, and the correlation of finite-time statistics from the advection-diffusion equation to these regions. For autonomous systems, invariant manifold theory can be used to separate the system into dynamically distinct regions. Despite there being no equivalent method for ...

Contributors
Walker, Phillip, Tang, Wenbo, Kostelich, Eric, et al.
Created Date
2018

Earth-system models describe the interacting components of the climate system and technological systems that affect society, such as communication infrastructures. Data assimilation addresses the challenge of state specification by incorporating system observations into the model estimates. In this research, a particular data assimilation technique called the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) is applied to the ionosphere, which is a domain of practical interest due to its effects on infrastructures that depend on satellite communication and remote sensing. This dissertation consists of three main studies that propose strategies to improve space- weather specification during ionospheric extreme events, but are generally ...

Contributors
Durazo, Juan Alberto, Kostelich, Eric J., Mahalov, Alex, et al.
Created Date
2018

Two urban flows are analyzed, one concerned with pollutant transport in a Phoenix, Arizona neighborhood and the other with windshear detection at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA). Lagrangian measures, identified with finite-time Lyapunov exponents, are first used to characterize transport patterns of inertial pollutant particles. Motivated by actual events the focus is on flows in realistic urban geometry. Both deterministic and stochastic transport patterns are identified, as inertial Lagrangian coherent structures. For the deterministic case, the organizing structures are well defined and are extracted at different hours of a day to reveal the variability of coherent patterns. For the ...

Contributors
Knutson, Brent, Tang, Wenbo, Calhoun, Ronald, et al.
Created Date
2018