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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Speech is generated by articulators acting on a phonatory source. Identification of this phonatory source and articulatory geometry are individually challenging and ill-posed problems, called speech separation and articulatory inversion, respectively. There exists a trade-off between decomposition and recovered articulatory geometry due to multiple possible mappings between an articulatory configuration and the speech produced. However, if measurements are obtained only from a microphone sensor, they lack any invasive insight and add additional challenge to an already difficult problem. A joint non-invasive estimation strategy that couples articulatory and phonatory knowledge would lead to better articulatory speech synthesis. In this thesis, a …

Contributors
Venkataramani, Adarsh Akkshai, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Bliss, Daniel W, et al.
Created Date
2018

The increased risk of falling and the worse ability to perform other daily physical activities in the elderly cause concern about monitoring and correcting basic everyday movement. In this thesis, a Kinect-based system was designed to assess one of the most important factors in balance control of human body when doing Sit-to-Stand (STS) movement: the postural symmetry in mediolateral direction. A symmetry score, calculated by the data obtained from a Kinect RGB-D camera, was proposed to reflect the mediolateral postural symmetry degree and was used to drive a real-time audio feedback designed in MAX/MSP to help users adjust themselves to …

Contributors
Zhou, Henghao, Turaga, Pavan, Ingalls, Todd, et al.
Created Date
2016

This work examines two main areas in model-based time-varying signal processing with emphasis in speech processing applications. The first area concentrates on improving speech intelligibility and on increasing the proposed methodologies application for clinical practice in speech-language pathology. The second area concentrates on signal expansions matched to physical-based models but without requiring independent basis functions; the significance of this work is demonstrated with speech vowels. A fully automated Vowel Space Area (VSA) computation method is proposed that can be applied to any type of speech. It is shown that the VSA provides an efficient and reliable measure and is correlated …

Contributors
Sandoval, Steven P., Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Liss, Julie M, et al.
Created Date
2016

Continuous monitoring of sensor data from smart phones to identify human activities and gestures, puts a heavy load on the smart phone's power consumption. In this research study, the non-Euclidean geometry of the rich sensor data obtained from the user's smart phone is utilized to perform compressive analysis and efficient classification of human activities by employing machine learning techniques. We are interested in the generalization of classical tools for signal approximation to newer spaces, such as rotation data, which is best studied in a non-Euclidean setting, and its application to activity analysis. Attributing to the non-linear nature of the rotation …

Contributors
Sivakumar, Aswin, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2014

Advancements in computer vision and machine learning have added a new dimension to remote sensing applications with the aid of imagery analysis techniques. Applications such as autonomous navigation and terrain classification which make use of image classification techniques are challenging problems and research is still being carried out to find better solutions. In this thesis, a novel method is proposed which uses image registration techniques to provide better image classification. This method reduces the error rate of classification by performing image registration of the images with the previously obtained images before performing classification. The motivation behind this is the fact …

Contributors
Muralidhar, Ashwini, Saripalli, Srikanth, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2011