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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


A critical problem for airborne, ship board, and land based radars operating in maritime or littoral environments is the detection, identification and tracking of targets against backscattering caused by the roughness of the sea surface. Statistical models, such as the compound K-distribution (CKD), were shown to accurately describe two separate structures of the sea clutter intensity fluctuations. The first structure is the texture that is associated with long sea waves and exhibits long temporal decorrelation period. The second structure is the speckle that accounts for reflections from multiple scatters and exhibits a short temporal decorrelation period from pulse to pulse. …

Contributors
Northrop, Judith, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2019

Underwater acoustic communications face significant challenges unprecedented in radio terrestrial communications including long multipath delay spreads, strong Doppler effects, and stringent bandwidth requirements. Recently, multi-carrier communications based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) have seen significant growth in underwater acoustic (UWA) communications, thanks to their well well-known robustness against severely time-dispersive channels. However, the performance of OFDM systems over UWA channels significantly deteriorates due to severe intercarrier interference (ICI) resulting from rapid time variations of the channel. With the motivation of developing enabling techniques for OFDM over UWA channels, the major contributions of this thesis include (1) two effective frequencydomain …

Contributors
Tu, Kai, Duman, Tolga M, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2011

Multidimensional (MD) discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is a key kernel algorithm in many signal processing applications, such as radar imaging and medical imaging. Traditionally, a two-dimensional (2-D) DFT is computed using Row-Column (RC) decomposition, where one-dimensional (1-D) DFTs are computed along the rows followed by 1-D DFTs along the columns. However, architectures based on RC decomposition are not efficient for large input size data which have to be stored in external memories based Synchronous Dynamic RAM (SDRAM). In this dissertation, first an efficient architecture to implement 2-D DFT for large-sized input data is proposed. This architecture achieves very high throughput …

Contributors
Yu, Chi-Li, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2012

This work considers the problem of multiple detection and tracking in two complex time-varying environments, urban terrain and underwater. Tracking multiple radar targets in urban environments is rst investigated by exploiting multipath signal returns, wideband underwater acoustic (UWA) communications channels are estimated using adaptive learning methods, and multiple UWA communications users are detected by designing the transmit signal to match the environment. For the urban environment, a multi-target tracking algorithm is proposed that integrates multipath-to-measurement association and the probability hypothesis density method implemented using particle filtering. The algorithm is designed to track an unknown time-varying number of targets by extracting …

Contributors
Zhou, Meng, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Neural activity tracking using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain scanning methods has been widely used in the field of neuroscience to provide insight into the nervous system. However, the tracking accuracy depends on the presence of artifacts in the EEG/MEG recordings. Artifacts include any signals that do not originate from neural activity, including physiological artifacts such as eye movement and non-physiological activity caused by the environment. This work proposes an integrated method for simultaneously tracking multiple neural sources using the probability hypothesis density particle filter (PPHDF) and reducing the effect of artifacts using feature extraction and stochastic modeling. Unique …

Contributors
Jiang, Jiewei, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Bliss, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2014

Tracking a time-varying number of targets is a challenging dynamic state estimation problem whose complexity is intensified under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or high clutter conditions. This is important, for example, when tracking multiple, closely spaced targets moving in the same direction such as a convoy of low observable vehicles moving through a forest or multiple targets moving in a crisscross pattern. The SNR in these applications is usually low as the reflected signals from the targets are weak or the noise level is very high. An effective approach for detecting and tracking a single target under low SNR conditions …

Contributors
Ebenezer, Samuel P., Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2015

Damage assessment and residual useful life estimation (RULE) are essential for aerospace, civil and naval structures. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) attempts to automate the process of damage detection and identification. Multiscale modeling is a key element in SHM. It not only provides important information on the physics of failure, such as damage initiation and growth, the output can be used as "virtual sensing" data for detection and prognosis. The current research is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary effort to develop an integrated SHM framework for metallic aerospace components. In this thesis a multiscale model has been developed by bridging the …

Contributors
Luo, Chuntao, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2011

Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage prediction, detection, and quantification methodologies. Multiscale computational models offer key advantages over traditional analysis techniques and can provide the necessary capabilities for the development of a comprehensive virtual structural health monitoring (SHM) framework. Virtual SHM has the potential to drastically improve the design and analysis of aerospace components through coupling the complementary capabilities of models able to predict the initiation and propagation of damage under a wide range of loading and environmental scenarios, simulate interrogation methods …

Contributors
Borkowski, Luke, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, Liu, Yongming, et al.
Created Date
2015

Damage detection in heterogeneous material systems is a complex problem and requires an in-depth understanding of the material characteristics and response under varying load and environmental conditions. A significant amount of research has been conducted in this field to enhance the fidelity of damage assessment methodologies, using a wide range of sensors and detection techniques, for both metallic materials and composites. However, detecting damage at the microscale is not possible with commercially available sensors. A probable way to approach this problem is through accurate and efficient multiscale modeling techniques, which are capable of tracking damage initiation at the microscale and …

Contributors
Zhang, Jinjun, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2014

This thesis aims to investigate the capacity and bit error rate (BER) performance of multi-user diversity systems with random number of users and considers its application to cognitive radio systems. Ergodic capacity, normalized capacity, outage capacity, and average bit error rate metrics are studied. It has been found that the randomization of the number of users will reduce the ergodic capacity. A stochastic ordering framework is adopted to order user distributions, for example, Laplace transform ordering. The ergodic capacity under different user distributions will follow their corresponding Laplace transform order. The scaling law of ergodic capacity with mean number of …

Contributors
Zeng, Ruochen, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, Duman, Tolga, et al.
Created Date
2012