Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Analysis of social networks has the potential to provide insights into wide range of applications. As datasets continue to grow, a key challenge is the lack of a widely applicable algorithmic framework for detection of statistically anomalous networks and network properties. Unlike traditional signal processing, where models of truth or empirical verification and background data exist and are often well defined, these features are commonly lacking in social and other networks. Here, a novel algorithmic framework for statistical signal processing for graphs is presented. The framework is based on the analysis of spectral properties of the residuals matrix. The framework …

Contributors
Bliss, Nadya Travinin, Laubichler, Manfred, Castillo-Chavez, Carlos, et al.
Created Date
2015

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition diagnosed on patients with clinical history and motor signs of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, and the estimated number of patients living with Parkinson's disease around the world is seven to ten million. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides substantial relief of the motor signs of Parkinson's disease patients. It is an advanced surgical technique that is used when drug therapy is no longer sufficient for Parkinson's disease patients. DBS alleviates the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease by targeting the subthalamic nucleus using high-frequency electrical stimulation. This work proposes a behavior recognition model for patients with …

Contributors
Dutta, Arindam, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Holbert, Keith E., et al.
Created Date
2015

Tracking a time-varying number of targets is a challenging dynamic state estimation problem whose complexity is intensified under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or high clutter conditions. This is important, for example, when tracking multiple, closely spaced targets moving in the same direction such as a convoy of low observable vehicles moving through a forest or multiple targets moving in a crisscross pattern. The SNR in these applications is usually low as the reflected signals from the targets are weak or the noise level is very high. An effective approach for detecting and tracking a single target under low SNR conditions …

Contributors
Ebenezer, Samuel P., Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2015

The utilization of power cables is increasing with the development of renewable energy and the maintenance replacement of old overhead power lines. Therefore, effective monitoring and accurate fault location for power cables are very important for the sake of a stable power supply. The recent technologies for power cable diagnosis and temperature monitoring system are described including their intrinsic limitations for cable health assessment. Power cable fault location methods are reviewed with two main categories: off-line and on-line data based methods. As a diagnostic and fault location approach, a new passive methodology is introduced. This methodology is based on analyzing …

Contributors
Kim, Young Deug, Holbert, Keith Edwin, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2015

This work considers the problem of multiple detection and tracking in two complex time-varying environments, urban terrain and underwater. Tracking multiple radar targets in urban environments is rst investigated by exploiting multipath signal returns, wideband underwater acoustic (UWA) communications channels are estimated using adaptive learning methods, and multiple UWA communications users are detected by designing the transmit signal to match the environment. For the urban environment, a multi-target tracking algorithm is proposed that integrates multipath-to-measurement association and the probability hypothesis density method implemented using particle filtering. The algorithm is designed to track an unknown time-varying number of targets by extracting …

Contributors
Zhou, Meng, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Peptide microarrays have been used in molecular biology to profile immune responses and develop diagnostic tools. When the microarrays are printed with random peptide sequences, they can be used to identify antigen antibody binding patterns or immunosignatures. In this thesis, an advanced signal processing method is proposed to estimate epitope antigen subsequences as well as identify mimotope antigen subsequences that mimic the structure of epitopes from random-sequence peptide microarrays. The method first maps peptide sequences to linear expansions of highly-localized one-dimensional (1-D) time-varying signals and uses a time-frequency processing technique to detect recurring patterns in subsequences. This technique is matched …

Contributors
O'Donnell, Brian Nickerson, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Bliss, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2014

Damage detection in heterogeneous material systems is a complex problem and requires an in-depth understanding of the material characteristics and response under varying load and environmental conditions. A significant amount of research has been conducted in this field to enhance the fidelity of damage assessment methodologies, using a wide range of sensors and detection techniques, for both metallic materials and composites. However, detecting damage at the microscale is not possible with commercially available sensors. A probable way to approach this problem is through accurate and efficient multiscale modeling techniques, which are capable of tracking damage initiation at the microscale and …

Contributors
Zhang, Jinjun, Chattopadhyay, Aditi, Dai, Lenore, et al.
Created Date
2014

Neural activity tracking using electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain scanning methods has been widely used in the field of neuroscience to provide insight into the nervous system. However, the tracking accuracy depends on the presence of artifacts in the EEG/MEG recordings. Artifacts include any signals that do not originate from neural activity, including physiological artifacts such as eye movement and non-physiological activity caused by the environment. This work proposes an integrated method for simultaneously tracking multiple neural sources using the probability hypothesis density particle filter (PPHDF) and reducing the effect of artifacts using feature extraction and stochastic modeling. Unique …

Contributors
Jiang, Jiewei, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Bliss, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2014

Continuous monitoring of sensor data from smart phones to identify human activities and gestures, puts a heavy load on the smart phone's power consumption. In this research study, the non-Euclidean geometry of the rich sensor data obtained from the user's smart phone is utilized to perform compressive analysis and efficient classification of human activities by employing machine learning techniques. We are interested in the generalization of classical tools for signal approximation to newer spaces, such as rotation data, which is best studied in a non-Euclidean setting, and its application to activity analysis. Attributing to the non-linear nature of the rotation …

Contributors
Sivakumar, Aswin, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2014

Dynamic channel selection in cognitive radio consists of two main phases. The first phase is spectrum sensing, during which the channels that are occupied by the primary users are detected. The second phase is channel selection, during which the state of the channel to be used by the secondary user is estimated. The existing cognitive radio channel selection literature assumes perfect spectrum sensing. However, this assumption becomes problematic as the noise in the channels increases, resulting in high probability of false alarm and high probability of missed detection. This thesis proposes a solution to this problem by incorporating the estimated …

Contributors
Zapp, Joseph Vincent, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Kovvali, Narayan, et al.
Created Date
2014