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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




In the last 15 years, there has been a significant increase in the number of motor neural prostheses used for restoring limb function lost due to neurological disorders or accidents. The aim of this technology is to enable patients to control a motor prosthesis using their residual neural pathways (central or peripheral). Recent studies in non-human primates and humans have shown the possibility of controlling a prosthesis for accomplishing varied tasks such as self-feeding, typing, reaching, grasping, and performing fine dexterous movements. A neural decoding system comprises mainly of three components: (i) sensors to record neural signals, (ii) an algorithm …

Contributors
Padmanaban, Subash, Greger, Bradley, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2017

Electrical neural activity detection and tracking have many applications in medical research and brain computer interface technologies. In this thesis, we focus on the development of advanced signal processing algorithms to track neural activity and on the mapping of these algorithms onto hardware to enable real-time tracking. At the heart of these algorithms is particle filtering (PF), a sequential Monte Carlo technique used to estimate the unknown parameters of dynamic systems. First, we analyze the bottlenecks in existing PF algorithms, and we propose a new parallel PF (PPF) algorithm based on the independent Metropolis-Hastings (IMH) algorithm. We show that the …

Contributors
Miao, Lifeng, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2013

The use of electromyography (EMG) signals to characterize muscle fatigue has been widely accepted. Initial work on characterizing muscle fatigue during isometric contractions demonstrated that its frequency decreases while its amplitude increases with the onset of fatigue. More recent work concentrated on developing techniques to characterize dynamic contractions for use in clinical and training applications. Studies demonstrated that as fatigue progresses, the EMG signal undergoes a shift in frequency, and different physiological mechanisms on the possible cause of the shift were considered. Time-frequency processing, using the Wigner distribution or spectrogram, is one of the techniques used to estimate the instantaneous …

Contributors
Austin, Hiroko, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Kovvali, Narayan, et al.
Created Date
2012

Research on developing new algorithms to improve information on brain functionality and structure is ongoing. Studying neural activity through dipole source localization with electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensor measurements can lead to diagnosis and treatment of a brain disorder and can also identify the area of the brain from where the disorder has originated. Designing advanced localization algorithms that can adapt to environmental changes is considered a significant shift from manual diagnosis which is based on the knowledge and observation of the doctor, to an adaptive and improved brain disorder diagnosis as these algorithms can track activities that might …

Contributors
Michael, Stefanos, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2012

The increased risk of falling and the worse ability to perform other daily physical activities in the elderly cause concern about monitoring and correcting basic everyday movement. In this thesis, a Kinect-based system was designed to assess one of the most important factors in balance control of human body when doing Sit-to-Stand (STS) movement: the postural symmetry in mediolateral direction. A symmetry score, calculated by the data obtained from a Kinect RGB-D camera, was proposed to reflect the mediolateral postural symmetry degree and was used to drive a real-time audio feedback designed in MAX/MSP to help users adjust themselves to …

Contributors
Zhou, Henghao, Turaga, Pavan, Ingalls, Todd, et al.
Created Date
2016