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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Advancements in computer vision and machine learning have added a new dimension to remote sensing applications with the aid of imagery analysis techniques. Applications such as autonomous navigation and terrain classification which make use of image classification techniques are challenging problems and research is still being carried out to find better solutions. In this thesis, a novel method is proposed which uses image registration techniques to provide better image classification. This method reduces the error rate of classification by performing image registration of the images with the previously obtained images before performing classification. The motivation behind this is the fact …

Contributors
Muralidhar, Ashwini, Saripalli, Srikanth, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2011

Tracking targets in the presence of clutter is inevitable, and presents many challenges. Additionally, rapid, drastic changes in clutter density between different environments or scenarios can make it even more difficult for tracking algorithms to adapt. A novel approach to target tracking in such dynamic clutter environments is proposed using a particle filter (PF) integrated with Interacting Multiple Models (IMMs) to compensate and adapt to the transition between different clutter densities. This model was implemented for the case of a monostatic sensor tracking a single target moving with constant velocity along a two-dimensional trajectory, which crossed between regions of drastically …

Contributors
Dutson, Karl J, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, Kovvali, Narayan, et al.
Created Date
2015

In the last 15 years, there has been a significant increase in the number of motor neural prostheses used for restoring limb function lost due to neurological disorders or accidents. The aim of this technology is to enable patients to control a motor prosthesis using their residual neural pathways (central or peripheral). Recent studies in non-human primates and humans have shown the possibility of controlling a prosthesis for accomplishing varied tasks such as self-feeding, typing, reaching, grasping, and performing fine dexterous movements. A neural decoding system comprises mainly of three components: (i) sensors to record neural signals, (ii) an algorithm …

Contributors
Padmanaban, Subash, Greger, Bradley, Santello, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2017

Deep learning architectures have been widely explored in computer vision and have depicted commendable performance in a variety of applications. A fundamental challenge in training deep networks is the requirement of large amounts of labeled training data. While gathering large quantities of unlabeled data is cheap and easy, annotating the data is an expensive process in terms of time, labor and human expertise. Thus, developing algorithms that minimize the human effort in training deep models is of immense practical importance. Active learning algorithms automatically identify salient and exemplar samples from large amounts of unlabeled data and can augment maximal information …

Contributors
Ranganathan, Hiranmayi, Sethuraman, Panchanathan, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2018