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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Demands in file size and transfer rates for consumer-orientated products have escalated in recent times. This is primarily due to the emergence of high definition video content. Now factor in the consumer desire for convenience, and we find that wireless service is the most desired approach for inter-connectivity. Consumers expect wireless service to emulate wired service with little to virtually no difference in quality of service (QoS). The background section of this document examines the QoS requirements for wireless connectivity of high definition video applications. I then proceed to look at proposed solutions at the physical (PHY) and the media …

Contributors
Bosco, Bruce, Reisslein, Martin, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, et al.
Created Date
2011

Today, many wireless networks are single-channel systems. However, as the interest in wireless services increases, the contention by nodes to occupy the medium is more intense and interference worsens. One direction with the potential to increase system throughput is multi-channel systems. Multi-channel systems have been shown to reduce collisions and increase concurrency thus producing better bandwidth usage. However, the well-known hidden- and exposed-terminal problems inherited from single-channel systems remain, and a new channel selection problem is introduced. In this dissertation, Multi-channel medium access control (MAC) protocols are proposed for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) for nodes equipped with a single …

Contributors
Moon, Yuhan, Syrotiuk, Violet R, Huang, Dijiang, et al.
Created Date
2010

We live in a networked world with a multitude of networks, such as communication networks, electric power grid, transportation networks and water distribution networks, all around us. In addition to such physical (infrastructure) networks, recent years have seen tremendous proliferation of social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Google+ and others. These powerful social networks are not only used for harnessing revenue from the infrastructure networks, but are also increasingly being used as “non-conventional sensors” for monitoring the infrastructure networks. Accordingly, nowadays, analyses of social and infrastructure networks go hand-in-hand. This dissertation studies resource allocation problems encountered in this …

Contributors
Mazumder, Anisha, Sen, Arunabha, Richa, Andrea, et al.
Created Date
2016