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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Wireless video sensor networks has been examined and evaluated for wide range of applications comprising of video surveillance, video tracking, computer vision, remote live video and control. The reason behind importance of sensor nodes is its ease of implementation, ability to operate in adverse environments, easy to troubleshoot, repair and the high performance level. The biggest challenges with the architectural design of wireless video sensor networks are power consumption, node failure, throughput, durability and scalability. The whole project here is to create a gateway node to integrate between "Internet of things" framework and wireless sensor network. Our Flexi-Wireless Video Sensor …

Contributors
Shah, Tejas, Reisslein, Martin, Kitchen, Jennifer, et al.
Created Date
2014