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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2011 2019


This dissertation presents research findings regarding the exploitation of localized surface plasmon (LSP) of epitaxial Ag islands as a means to enhance the photoluminescence (PL) of Germanium (Ge) quantum dots (QDs). The first step of this project was to investigate the growth of Ag islands on Si(100). Two distinct families of Ag islands have been observed. “Big islands” are clearly faceted and have basal dimensions in the few hundred nm to μm range with a variety of basal shapes. “Small islands” are not clearly faceted and have basal diameters in the 10s of nm range. Big islands form via a ...

Contributors
Kong, Dexin, Drucker, Jeffery, Chen, Tingyong, et al.
Created Date
2015

Fluorescence spectroscopy is a popular technique that has been particularly useful in probing biological systems, especially with the invention of single molecule fluorescence. For example, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one tool that has been helpful in probing distances and conformational changes in biomolecules. In this work, important properties necessary in the quantification of FRET were investigated while FRET was also applied to gain insight into the dynamics of biological molecules. In particular, dynamics of damaged DNA was investigated. While damages in DNA are known to affect DNA structure, what remains unclear is how the presence of a lesion, ...

Contributors
Stennett, Elana Maria Shepherd, Levitus, Marcia, Ros, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2015

Proteins are essential for most biological processes that constitute life. The function of a protein is encoded within its 3D folded structure, which is determined by its sequence of amino acids. A variation of a single nucleotide in the DNA during transcription (nSNV) can alter the amino acid sequence (i.e., a mutation in the protein sequence), which can adversely impact protein function and sometimes cause disease. These mutations are the most prevalent form of variations in humans, and each individual genome harbors tens of thousands of nSNVs that can be benign (neutral) or lead to disease. The primary way to ...

Contributors
Butler, Brandon Mac, Ozkan, S. Banu, Vaiana, Sara, et al.
Created Date
2016

The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of directly probing the mechanics of samples with length scales from single molecules to tissues and force scales from pico to micronewtons. In particular, AFM is widely used as a tool to measure the elastic modulus of soft biological samples by collecting force-indentation relationships and fitting these to classic elastic contact models. However, the analysis of raw force-indentation data may be complicated by mechanical heterogeneity present in biological systems. An analytical model of an elastic indentation on a bonded two-layer sample was solved. This may be used to account for substrate effects and ...

Contributors
Doss, Bryant Lee, Ros, Robert, Lindsay, Stuart, et al.
Created Date
2015

This thesis describes several approaches to next generation DNA sequencing via tunneling current method based on a Scanning Tunneling Microscope system. In chapters 5 and 6, preliminary results have shown that DNA bases could be identified by their characteristic tunneling signals. Measurements taken in aqueous buffered solution showed that single base resolution could be achieved with economic setups. In chapter 7, it is illustrated that some ongoing measurements are indicating the sequence readout by making linear scan on a piece of short DNA oligomer. However, to overcome the difficulties of controlling DNA especially ssDNA movement, it is much better to ...

Contributors
Huang, Shuo, Lindsay, Stuart, Sankey, Otto, et al.
Created Date
2011

One of the most important issues in femtosecond free electron laser X-ray diraction is to reconstruct the 3D charge density of molecule from a mass of diraction snapshots. In order to determine the orientation of single molecule from diraction patterns, we rst determine the moments and products of inertia of this from 2D experiment data (diraction patterns or EM images to obtain the elements of the inertia tensor. If diraction patterns from uniformly random orientations or some preferred orientations are collected, the principal axes of the molecule can be extracted, together with the Euler angles which relate the principal axes ...

Contributors
Wang, Xiaoyu, Spence, John C.H., Schmidt, Kevin, et al.
Created Date
2011

Cell adhesion is an important aspect of many biological processes. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has made it possible to quantify the forces involved in cellular adhesion using a technique called single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). AFM based SCFS offers versatile control over experimental conditions for probing directly the interaction between specific cell types and specific proteins, surfaces, or other cells. Transmembrane integrins are the primary proteins involved in cellular adhesion to the extra cellular matix (ECM). One of the chief integrins involved in the adhesion of leukocyte cells is αMβ2 (Mac-1). The experiments in this dissertation quantify the adhesion ...

Contributors
Christenson, Wayne B, Ros, Robert, Beckstein, Oliver, et al.
Created Date
2016

Na+/H+ antiporters are vital membrane proteins for cell homeostasis, transporting Na+ ions in exchange for H+ across the lipid bilayer. In humans, dysfunction of these transporters are implicated in hypertension, heart failure, epilepsy, and autism, making them well-established drug targets. Although experimental structures for bacterial homologs of the human Na+/H+ have been obtained, the detailed mechanism for ion transport is still not well-understood. The most well-studied of these transporters, Escherichia coli NhaA, known to transport 2 H+ for every Na+ extruded, was recently shown to bind H+ and Na+ at the same binding site, for which the two ion species ...

Contributors
Dotson, David Lee, Beckstein, Oliver, Ozkan, Sefika B, et al.
Created Date
2016

Proteins are a fundamental unit in biology. Although proteins have been extensively studied, there is still much to investigate. The mechanism by which proteins fold into their native state, how evolution shapes structural dynamics, and the dynamic mechanisms of many diseases are not well understood. In this thesis, protein folding is explored using a multi-scale modeling method including (i) geometric constraint based simulations that efficiently search for native like topologies and (ii) reservoir replica exchange molecular dynamics, which identify the low free energy structures and refines these structures toward the native conformation. A test set of eight proteins and three ...

Contributors
Glembo, Tyler, Ozkan, Sefika B, Thorpe, Michael F, et al.
Created Date
2011

Photosystem II (PSII) is a large protein-cofactor complex. The first step in photosynthesis involves the harvesting of light energy from the sun by the antenna (made of pigments) of the PSII trans-membrane complex. The harvested excitation energy is transferred from the antenna complex to the reaction center of the PSII, which leads to a light-driven charge separation event, from water to plastoquinone. This phenomenal process has been producing the oxygen that maintains the oxygenic environment of our planet for the past 2.5 billion years. The oxygen molecule formation involves the light-driven extraction of 4 electrons and protons from two water ...

Contributors
Basu, Shibom, Fromme, Petra, Spence, John C.H., et al.
Created Date
2015