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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Magnetic resonance flow imaging techniques provide quantitative and qualitative information that can be attributed to flow related clinical pathologies. Clinical use of MR flow quantification requires fast acquisition and reconstruction schemes, and minimization of post processing errors. The purpose of this work is to provide improvements to the post processing of volumetric phase contrast MRI (PCMRI) data, identify a source of flow bias for cine PCMRI that has not been previously reported in the literature, and investigate a dynamic approach to image bulk cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in ventricular shunts. The proposed improvements are implemented as three research projects. In …

Contributors
Ragunathan, Sudarshan, Pipe, James G, Frakes, David, et al.
Created Date
2017

Recent new experiments showed that wide-field imaging at millimeter scale is capable of recording hundreds of neurons in behaving mice brain. Monitoring hundreds of individual neurons at a high frame rate provides a promising tool for discovering spatiotemporal features of large neural networks. However, processing the massive data sets is impossible without automated procedures. Thus, this thesis aims at developing a new tool to automatically segment and track individual neuron cells. The new method used in this study employs two major ideas including feature extraction based on power spectral density of single neuron temporal activity and clustering tree to separate …

Contributors
Wu, Ruofan, Si, Jennie, Sadleir, Rosalind, et al.
Created Date
2016

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a valuable technique for assessing the in vivo spatial profiles of metabolites like N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine, choline, and lactate. Changes in metabolite concentrations can help identify tissue heterogeneity, providing prognostic and diagnostic information to the clinician. The increased uptake of glucose by solid tumors as compared to normal tissues and its conversion to lactate can be exploited for tumor diagnostics, anti-cancer therapy, and in the detection of metastasis. Lactate levels in cancer cells are suggestive of altered metabolism, tumor recurrence, and poor outcome. A dedicated technique like MRSI could contribute to an improved assessment …

Contributors
Vidya Shankar, Rohini, Kodibagkar, Vikram D, Pipe, James, et al.
Created Date
2016

Heart transplantation is the final treatment option for end-stage heart failure. In the United States, 70 pediatric patients die annually on the waitlist while 800 well-functioning organs get discarded. Concern for potential size-mismatch is one source of allograft waste and high waitlist mortality. Clinicians use the donor-recipient body weight (DRBW) ratio, a standalone metric, to evaluate allograft size-match. However, this body weight metric is far removed from cardiac anatomy and neglects an individual’s anatomical variations. This thesis body of work developed a novel virtual heart transplant fit assessment tool and investigated the tool’s clinical utility to help clinicians safely expand …

Contributors
Plasencia, Jonathan, Frakes, David H, Kodibagkar, Vikram, et al.
Created Date
2018

Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) is a powerful tool used to quantitatively measure parameters related to blood flow and volume in the brain. The technique is known as a “bolus-tracking” method and relies upon very fast scanning to accurately measure the flow of contrast agent into and out of a region of interest. The need for high temporal resolution to measure contrast agent dynamics limits the spatial coverage of perfusion parameter maps which limits the utility of DSC-perfusion studies in pathologies involving the entire brain. Typical clinical DSC-perfusion studies are capable of acquiring 10-15 slices, generally centered on a known …

Contributors
Turley, Dallas, Pipe, James G, Kodibagkar, Vikram, et al.
Created Date
2017

Hypoxia is a pathophysiological condition which results from lack of oxygen supply in tumors. The assessment of tumor hypoxia and its response to therapies can provide guidelines for optimization and personalization of therapeutic protocols for better treatment. Previous research has shown the difficulty in measuring hypoxia anatomically due to its heterogenous nature. This makes the study of hypoxia through various imaging modalities and mapping techniques crucial. The potential of hypoxia targeting T1 contrast agent GdDO3NI in generating hypoxia maps has been studied earlier. In this work, the similarities between hypoxia maps generated by MRI using GdDO3NI and pimonidazole based immunohistochemistry …

Contributors
Sahu, Sulagna, Kodibagkar, Vikram D., Sadleir, Rosalind, et al.
Created Date
2018

Bioimpedance measurements have been long used for monitoring tissue ischemia and blood flow. This research employs implantable microelectronic devices to measure impedance chronically as a potential way to monitor the progress of peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Ultrasonically powered implantable microdevices previously developed for the purposes of neuroelectric vasodilation for therapeutic treatment of PVD were found to also allow a secondary function of tissue bioimpedance monitoring. Having no structural differences between devices used for neurostimulation and impedance measurements, there is a potential for double functionality and closed loop control of the neurostimulation performed by these types of microimplants. The proposed technique …

Contributors
Celinskis, Dmitrijs, Towe, Bruce, Greger, Bradley, et al.
Created Date
2015

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an efficient non-invasive imaging tool widely used in medical field to produce high quality images. The MRI signal is detected with specifically developed radio frequency (RF) systems or "coils". There are several key parameters to evaluate the performance of RF coils: signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), homogeneity, quality factor (Q factor), sensitivity, etc. The choice of coil size and configuration depends on the object to be imaged. While surface coils have better sensitivity, volume coils are often employed to image a larger region of interest (ROI) as they display better spatial homogeneity. For the cell labeling and …

Contributors
Wang, Haiqing, Kodibagkar, Vikram, Stabenfeldt, Sarah, et al.
Created Date
2014

A direct Magnetic Resonance (MR)-based neural activity mapping technique with high spatial and temporal resolution may accelerate studies of brain functional organization. The most widely used technique for brain functional imaging is functional Magnetic Resonance Image (fMRI). The spatial resolution of fMRI is high. However, fMRI signals are highly influenced by the vasculature in each voxel and can be affected by capillary orientation and vessel size. Functional MRI analysis may, therefore, produce misleading results when voxels are nearby large vessels. Another problem in fMRI is that hemodynamic responses are slower than the neuronal activity. Therefore, temporal resolution is limited in …

Contributors
Fu, Fanrui, Sadleir, Rosalind, Kodibagkar, Vikram, et al.
Created Date
2019