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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


With the massive multithreading execution feature, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely deployed to accelerate general-purpose parallel workloads (GPGPUs). However, using GPUs to accelerate computation does not always gain good performance improvement. This is mainly due to three inefficiencies in modern GPU and system architectures. First, not all parallel threads have a uniform amount of workload to fully utilize GPU’s computation ability, leading to a sub-optimal performance problem, called warp criticality. To mitigate the degree of warp criticality, I propose a Criticality-Aware Warp Acceleration mechanism, called CAWA. CAWA predicts and accelerates the critical warp execution by allocating larger execution …

Contributors
Lee, Shin-Ying, Wu, Carole-Jean, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2017

Caches have long been used to reduce memory access latency. However, the increased complexity of cache coherence brings significant challenges in processor design as the number of cores increases. While making caches scalable is still an important research problem, some researchers are exploring the possibility of a more power-efficient SRAM called scratchpad memories or SPMs. SPMs consume significantly less area, and are more energy-efficient per access than caches, and therefore make the design of on-chip memories much simpler. Unlike caches, which fetch data from memories automatically, an SPM requires explicit instructions for data transfers. SPM-only architectures are thus named as …

Contributors
Cai, Jian, Shrivastava, Aviral, Wu, Carole, et al.
Created Date
2017