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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are being used in many safety-critical applications. Due to the important role in virtually every aspect of human life, it is crucial to make sure that a CPS works properly before its deployment. However, formal verification of CPS is a computationally hard problem. Therefore, lightweight verification methods such as testing and monitoring of the CPS are considered in the industry. The formal representation of the CPS requirements is a challenging task. In addition, checking the system outputs with respect to requirements is a computationally complex problem. In this dissertation, these problems for the verification of CPS are …

Contributors
Dokhanchi, Adel, Fainekos, Georgios, Lee, Yann-Hang, et al.
Created Date
2017

Several decades of transistor technology scaling has brought the threat of soft errors to modern embedded processors. Several techniques have been proposed to protect these systems from soft errors. However, their effectiveness in protecting the computation cannot be ascertained without accurate and quantitative estimation of system reliability. Vulnerability -- a metric that defines the probability of system-failure (reliability) through analytical models -- is the most effective mechanism for our current estimation and early design space exploration needs. Previous vulnerability estimation tools are based around the Sim-Alpha simulator which has been to shown to have several limitations. In this thesis, I …

Contributors
Tanikella, Srinivas Karthik, Shrivastava, Aviral, Bazzi, Rida, et al.
Created Date
2016

Designers employ a variety of modeling theories and methodologies to create functional models of discrete network systems. These dynamical models are evaluated using verification and validation techniques throughout incremental design stages. Models created for these systems should directly represent their growing complexity with respect to composition and heterogeneity. Similar to software engineering practices, incremental model design is required for complex system design. As a result, models at early increments are significantly simpler relative to real systems. While experimenting (verification or validation) on models at early increments are computationally less demanding, the results of these experiments are less trustworthy and less …

Contributors
Gholami, Soroosh, Sarjoughian, Hessam S, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2017

Performance improvements have largely followed Moore's Law due to the help from technology scaling. In order to continue improving performance, power-efficiency must be reduced. Better technology has improved power-efficiency, but this has a limit. Multi-core architectures have been shown to be an additional aid to this crusade of increased power-efficiency. Accelerators are growing in popularity as the next means of achieving power-efficient performance. Accelerators such as Intel SSE are ideal, but prove difficult to program. FPGAs, on the other hand, are less efficient due to their fine-grained reconfigurability. A middle ground is found in CGRAs, which are highly power-efficient, but …

Contributors
Pager, Jared, Shrivastava, Aviral, Gupta, Sandeep, et al.
Created Date
2011

Soft errors are considered as a key reliability challenge for sub-nano scale transistors. An ideal solution for such a challenge should ultimately eliminate the effect of soft errors from the microprocessor. While forward recovery techniques achieve fast recovery from errors by simply voting out the wrong values, they incur the overhead of three copies execution. Backward recovery techniques only need two copies of execution, but suffer from check-pointing overhead. In this work I explored the efficiency of integrating check-pointing into the application and the effectiveness of recovery that can be performed upon it. After evaluating the available fine-grained approaches to …

Contributors
Lokam, Sai Ram Dheeraj, Shrivastava, Aviral, Clark, Lawrence T, et al.
Created Date
2016

With the massive multithreading execution feature, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely deployed to accelerate general-purpose parallel workloads (GPGPUs). However, using GPUs to accelerate computation does not always gain good performance improvement. This is mainly due to three inefficiencies in modern GPU and system architectures. First, not all parallel threads have a uniform amount of workload to fully utilize GPU’s computation ability, leading to a sub-optimal performance problem, called warp criticality. To mitigate the degree of warp criticality, I propose a Criticality-Aware Warp Acceleration mechanism, called CAWA. CAWA predicts and accelerates the critical warp execution by allocating larger execution …

Contributors
Lee, Shin-Ying, Wu, Carole-Jean, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, et al.
Created Date
2017

The availability of a wide range of general purpose as well as accelerator cores on modern smartphones means that a significant number of applications can be executed on a smartphone simultaneously, resulting in an ever increasing demand on the memory subsystem. While the increased computation capability is intended for improving user experience, memory requests from each concurrent application exhibit unique memory access patterns as well as specific timing constraints. If not considered, this could lead to significant memory contention and result in lowered user experience. This work first analyzes the impact of memory degradation caused by the interference at the …

Contributors
SHINGARI, DAVESH, Wu, Carole-Jean, Vrudhula, Sarma, et al.
Created Date
2016

General-purpose processors propel the advances and innovations that are the subject of humanity’s many endeavors. Catering to this demand, chip-multiprocessors (CMPs) and general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have seen many high-performance innovations in their architectures. With these advances, the memory subsystem has become the performance- and energy-limiting aspect of CMPs and GPGPUs alike. This dissertation identifies and mitigates the key performance and energy-efficiency bottlenecks in the memory subsystem of general-purpose processors via novel, practical, microarchitecture and system-architecture solutions. Addressing the important Last Level Cache (LLC) management problem in CMPs, I observe that LLC management decisions made in isolation, as in …

Contributors
Arunkumar, Akhil, Wu, Carole-Jean, Shrivastava, Aviral, et al.
Created Date
2018

Threshold logic has long been studied as a means of achieving higher performance and lower power dissipation, providing improvements by condensing simple logic gates into more complex primitives, effectively reducing gate count, pipeline depth, and number of interconnects. This work proposes a new physical implementation of threshold logic, the threshold logic latch (TLL), which overcomes the difficulties observed in previous work, particularly with respect to gate reliability in the presence of noise and process variations. Simple but effective models were created to assess the delay, power, and noise margin of TLL gates for the purpose of determining the physical parameters …

Contributors
Leshner, Samuel, Vrudhula, Sarma, Chatha, Karamvir, et al.
Created Date
2010

Error correcting systems have put increasing demands on system designers, both due to increasing error correcting requirements and higher throughput targets. These requirements have led to greater silicon area, power consumption and have forced system designers to make trade-offs in Error Correcting Code (ECC) functionality. Solutions to increase the efficiency of ECC systems are very important to system designers and have become a heavily researched area. Many such systems incorporate the Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) method of error correcting in a multi-channel configuration. BCH is a commonly used code because of its configurability, low storage overhead, and low decoding requirements when compared …

Contributors
Dill, Russell, Shrivastava, Aviral, Oh, Hyunok, et al.
Created Date
2015