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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


Spike sorting is a critical step for single-unit-based analysis of neural activities extracellularly and simultaneously recorded using multi-channel electrodes. When dealing with recordings from very large numbers of neurons, existing methods, which are mostly semiautomatic in nature, become inadequate. This dissertation aims at automating the spike sorting process. A high performance, automatic and computationally efficient spike detection and clustering system, namely, the M-Sorter2 is presented. The M-Sorter2 employs the modified multiscale correlation of wavelet coefficients (MCWC) for neural spike detection. At the center of the proposed M-Sorter2 are two automatic spike clustering methods. They share a common hierarchical agglomerative modeling …

Contributors
Ma, Weichao, Si, Jennie, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2019

This thesis addresses the design and control of three phase inverters. Such inverters are used to produce three-phase sinusoidal voltages and currents from a DC source. They are critical for injecting power from renewable energy sources into the grid. This is especially true since many of these sources of energy are DC sources (e.g. solar photovoltaic) or need to be stored in DC batteries because they are intermittent (e.g. wind and solar). Two classes of inverters are examined in this thesis. A control-centric design procedure is presented for each class. The first class of inverters is simple in that they …

Contributors
Sarkar, Aratrik, Rodriguez, Armando A., Si, Jennie, et al.
Created Date
2015

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are widely used in many applications because of their small size, great mobility and hover performance. This has been a consequence of the fast development of electronics, cheap lightweight flight controllers for accurate positioning and cameras. This thesis describes modeling, control and design of an oblique-cross-quadcopter platform for indoor-environments. One contribution of the work was the design of a new printed-circuit-board (PCB) flight controller (called MARK3). Key features/capabilities are as follows: (1) a Teensy 3.2 microcontroller with 168MHz overclock –used for communications, full-state estimation and inner-outer loop hierarchical rate-angle-speed-position control, (2) an on-board MEMS inertial-measurement-unit (IMU) …

Contributors
Lu, Shi, Rodriguez, Armando A., Tsakalis, Konstantinos, et al.
Created Date
2018

Toward the ambitious long-term goal of a fleet of cooperating Flexible Autonomous Machines operating in an uncertain Environment (FAME), this thesis addresses several critical modeling, design and control objectives for ground vehicles. One central objective was to show how off-the-shelf (low-cost) remote-control (RC) “toy” vehicles can be converted into intelligent multi-capability robotic-platforms for conducting FAME research. This is shown for two vehicle classes: (1) six differential-drive (DD) RC vehicles called Thunder Tumbler (DDTT) and (2) one rear-wheel drive (RWD) RC car called Ford F-150 (1:14 scale). Each DDTT-vehicle was augmented to provide a substantive suite of capabilities as summarized below …

Contributors
Lin, Zhenyu, Rodriguez, Armando Antonio, Rodriguez, Armando Antonio, et al.
Created Date
2015

This thesis presents approaches to develop micro seismometers and accelerometers based on molecular electronic transducers (MET) technology using MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) techniques. MET is a technology applied in seismic instrumentation that proves highly beneficial to planetary seismology. It consists of an electrochemical cell that senses the movement of liquid electrolyte between electrodes by converting it to the output current. MET seismometers have advantages of high sensitivity, low noise floor, small size, absence of fragile mechanical moving parts and independence on the direction of sensitivity axis. By using MEMS techniques, a micro MET seismometer is developed with inter-electrode spacing close to …

Contributors
Huang, Hai, Yu, Hongyu, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2014

This dissertation considers an integrated approach to system design and controller design based on analyzing limits of system performance. Historically, plant design methodologies have not incorporated control relevant considerations. Such an approach could result in a system that might not meet its specifications (or one that requires a complex control architecture to do so). System and controller designers often go through several iterations in order to converge to an acceptable plant and controller design. The focus of this dissertation is on the design and control an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle using such an integrated system-control design framework. The goal is to …

Contributors
Sridharan, Srikanth, Rodriguez, Armando A, Mittelmann, Hans D, et al.
Created Date
2014

This thesis presents a multi-modal motion tracking system for stroke patient rehabilitation. This system deploys two sensor modules: marker-based motion capture system and inertial measurement unit (IMU). The integrated system provides real-time measurement of the right arm and trunk movement, even in the presence of marker occlusion. The information from the two sensors is fused through quaternion-based recursive filters to promise robust detection of torso compensation (undesired body motion). Since this algorithm allows flexible sensor configurations, it presents a framework for fusing the IMU data and vision data that can adapt to various sensor selection scenarios. The proposed system consequently …

Contributors
Liu, Yangzi, Qian, Gang, Olson, Loren, et al.
Created Date
2010

This thesis addresses control design for fixed-wing air-breathing aircraft. Four aircraft with distinct dynamical properties are considered: a scram-jet powered hypersonic (100foot long, X-43 like, wedge shaped) aircraft with flexible modes operating near Mach 8, 85k ft, a NASA HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) F-18 aircraft, a McDonnell Douglas AV-8A Harrier aircraft, and a Vought F-8 Crusader aircraft. A two-input two-output (TITO) longitudinal LTI (linear time invariant) dynamical model is used for each aircraft. Control design trade studies are conducted for each of the aircraft. Emphasis is placed on the hypersonic vehicle because of its complex nonlinear (unstable, non-minimum phase, …

Contributors
Mondal, Kaustav, Rodriguez, Armando Antonio, Tsakalis, Kostas, et al.
Created Date
2015

The combined heat and power (CHP)-based distributed generation (DG) or dis-tributed energy resources (DERs) are mature options available in the present energy mar-ket, considered to be an effective solution to promote energy efficiency. In the urban en-vironment, the electricity, water and natural gas distribution networks are becoming in-creasingly interconnected with the growing penetration of the CHP-based DG. Subse-quently, this emerging interdependence leads to new topics meriting serious consideration: how much of the CHP-based DG can be accommodated and where to locate these DERs, and given preexisting constraints, how to quantify the mutual impacts on operation performances between these urban energy …

Contributors
Zhang, Xianjun, Karady, George G., Ariaratnam, Samuel T., et al.
Created Date
2013

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) were first imagined as a technology that would allow subjects to have direct communication with prosthetics and external devices (e.g. control over a computer cursor or robotic arm movement). Operation of these devices was not automatic, and subjects needed calibration and training in order to master this control. In short, learning became a key component in controlling these systems. As a result, BMIs have become ideal tools to probe and explore brain activity, since they allow the isolation of neural inputs and systematic altering of the relationships between the neural signals and output. I have used BMIs …

Contributors
Armenta Salas, Michelle, Helms Tillery, Stephen I, Si, Jennie, et al.
Created Date
2015