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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has great potential to address worldwide spectrum shortage by enhancing spectrum efficiency. It allows unlicensed secondary users to access the under-utilized spectrum when the primary users are not transmitting. On the other hand, the open wireless medium subjects DSA systems to various security and privacy issues, which might hinder the practical deployment. This dissertation consists of two parts to discuss the potential challenges and solutions. The first part consists of three chapters, with a focus on secondary-user authentication. Chapter One gives an overview of the challenges and existing solutions in spectrum-misuse detection. Chapter Two presents SpecGuard, …

Contributors
Jin, Xiaocong, Zhang, Yanchao, Zhang, Junshan, et al.
Created Date
2017

The research on the topology and dynamics of complex networks is one of the most focused area in complex system science. The goals are to structure our understanding of the real-world social, economical, technological, and biological systems in the aspect of networks consisting a large number of interacting units and to develop corresponding detection, prediction, and control strategies. In this highly interdisciplinary field, my research mainly concentrates on universal estimation schemes, physical controllability, as well as mechanisms behind extreme events and cascading failure for complex networked systems. Revealing the underlying structure and dynamics of complex networked systems from observed data …

Contributors
Chen, Yuzhong Chen, Lai, Ying-Cheng, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2016

In this dissertation, I propose potential techniques to improve the quality-of-service (QoS) of real-time applications in cognitive radio (CR) systems. Unlike best-effort applications, real-time applications, such as audio and video, have a QoS that need to be met. There are two different frameworks that are used to study the QoS in the literature, namely, the average-delay and the hard-deadline frameworks. In the former, the scheduling algorithm has to guarantee that the packet's average delay is below a prespecified threshold while the latter imposes a hard deadline on each packet in the system. In this dissertation, I present joint power allocation …

Contributors
Ewaisha, Ahmed, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, Ying, Lei, et al.
Created Date
2016

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study stochastic optimization and real-time scheduling in cyber-physical systems (CPSs) ranging from real-time wireless systems to energy systems to distributed control systems. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts based on the system environments. The first part investigates stochastic optimization in real-time wireless systems, with the focus on the deadline-aware scheduling for real-time traffic. The optimal solution to such scheduling problems requires to explicitly taking into account the coupling in the deadline-aware transmissions and stochastic characteristics of the traffic, which involves a dynamic program that is …

Contributors
Yang, Lei, Zhang, Junshan, Tepedelenlioglu, Cihan, et al.
Created Date
2012