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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Approximately 1% of the world population suffers from epilepsy. Continuous long-term electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring is the gold-standard for recording epileptic seizures and assisting in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. However, this process still requires that seizures are visually detected and marked by experienced and trained electroencephalographers. The motivation for the development of an automated seizure detection algorithm in this research was to assist physicians in such a laborious, time consuming and expensive task. Seizures in the EEG vary in duration (seconds to minutes), morphology and severity (clinical to subclinical, occurrence rate) within the same patient and across …

Contributors
Venkataraman, Vinay, Jassemidis, Leonidas, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2012

Development of post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern (5% - 50% of TBI cases). A significant problem in TBI management is the inability to predict which patients will develop PTE. Such prediction, followed by timely treatment, could be highly beneficial to TBI patients. Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a controlled cortical impact (CCI). A 6mm piston was pneumatically driven 3mm into the right parietal cortex with velocity of 5.5m/s. The rats were subsequently implanted with 6 intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG) electrodes. Long-term (14-week) continuous EEG recordings were conducted. Using linear (coherence) and …

Contributors
Tobin, Edward, Iasemidis, Leonidas, Tsakalis, Konstantinos, et al.
Created Date
2012