Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Status
  • Public
Date Range
2010 2019


In today's global market, companies are facing unprecedented levels of uncertainties in supply, demand and in the economic environment. A critical issue for companies to survive increasing competition is to monitor the changing business environment and manage disturbances and changes in real time. In this dissertation, an integrated framework is proposed using simulation and online calibration methods to enable the adaptive management of large-scale complex supply chain systems. The design, implementation and verification of the integrated approach are studied in this dissertation. The research contributions are two-fold. First, this work enriches symbiotic simulation methodology by proposing a framework of simulation …

Contributors
Wang, Shanshan, Wu, Teresa, Fowler, John, et al.
Created Date
2010

Optimization of surgical operations is a challenging managerial problem for surgical suite directors. This dissertation presents modeling and solution techniques for operating room (OR) planning and scheduling problems. First, several sequencing and patient appointment time setting heuristics are proposed for scheduling an Outpatient Procedure Center. A discrete event simulation model is used to evaluate how scheduling heuristics perform with respect to the competing criteria of expected patient waiting time and expected surgical suite overtime for a single day compared to current practice. Next, a bi-criteria Genetic Algorithm is used to determine if better solutions can be obtained for this single …

Contributors
Gul, Serhat, Fowler, John W., Denton, Brian T., et al.
Created Date
2010

Surgery is one of the most important functions in a hospital with respect to operational cost, patient flow, and resource utilization. Planning and scheduling the Operating Room (OR) is important for hospitals to improve efficiency and achieve high quality of service. At the same time, it is a complex task due to the conflicting objectives and the uncertain nature of surgeries. In this dissertation, three different methodologies are developed to address OR planning and scheduling problem. First, a simulation-based framework is constructed to analyze the factors that affect the utilization of a catheterization lab and provide decision support for improving …

Contributors
Li, Qing, Fowler, John W, Mohan, Srimathy, et al.
Created Date
2010

Overcrowding of Emergency Departments (EDs) put the safety of patients at risk. Decision makers implement Ambulance Diversion (AD) as a way to relieve congestion and ensure timely treatment delivery. However, ineffective design of AD policies reduces the accessibility to emergency care and adverse events may arise. The objective of this dissertation is to propose methods to design and analyze effective AD policies that consider performance measures that are related to patient safety. First, a simulation-based methodology is proposed to evaluate the mean performance and variability of single-factor AD policies in a single hospital environment considering the trade-off between average waiting …

Contributors
Ramirez Nafarrate, Adrian, Fowler, John W., Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2011

This research by studies the computational performance of four different mixed integer programming (MIP) formulations for single machine scheduling problems with varying complexity. These formulations are based on (1) start and completion time variables, (2) time index variables, (3) linear ordering variables and (4) assignment and positional date variables. The objective functions that are studied in this paper are total weighted completion time, maximum lateness, number of tardy jobs and total weighted tardiness. Based on the computational results, discussion and recommendations are made on which MIP formulation might work best for these problems. The performances of these formulations very much …

Contributors
Khowala, Ketan, Fowler, John, Keha, Ahmet, et al.
Created Date
2012

Buildings (approximately half commercial and half residential) consume over 70% of the electricity among all the consumption units in the United States. Buildings are also responsible for approximately 40% of CO2 emissions, which is more than any other industry sectors. As a result, the initiative smart building which aims to not only manage electrical consumption in an efficient way but also reduce the damaging effect of greenhouse gases on the environment has been launched. Another important technology being promoted by government agencies is the smart grid which manages energy usage across a wide range of buildings in an effort to …

Contributors
Hu, Mengqi, Wu, Teresa, Weir, Jeffery, et al.
Created Date
2012

A Pairwise Comparison Matrix (PCM) is used to compute for relative priorities of criteria or alternatives and are integral components of widely applied decision making tools: the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and its generalized form, the Analytic Network Process (ANP). However, a PCM suffers from several issues limiting its application to large-scale decision problems, specifically: (1) to the curse of dimensionality, that is, a large number of pairwise comparisons need to be elicited from a decision maker (DM), (2) inconsistent and (3) imprecise preferences maybe obtained due to the limited cognitive power of DMs. This dissertation proposes a PCM Framework …

Contributors
Jalao, Eugene Rex Lazaro, Shunk, Dan L, Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2013

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant tumor and seventh most common cancer in human. Every year there is a significant rise in the number of patients suffering from HCC. Most clinical research has focused on HCC early detection so that there are high chances of patient's survival. Emerging advancements in functional and structural imaging techniques have provided the ability to detect microscopic changes in tumor micro environment and micro structure. The prime focus of this thesis is to validate the applicability of advanced imaging modality, Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE), for HCC diagnosis. The research was carried out on three HCC …

Contributors
Bansal, Gaurav, Wu, Teresa, Mitchell, Ross, et al.
Created Date
2013

Identifying important variation patterns is a key step to identifying root causes of process variability. This gives rise to a number of challenges. First, the variation patterns might be non-linear in the measured variables, while the existing research literature has focused on linear relationships. Second, it is important to remove noise from the dataset in order to visualize the true nature of the underlying patterns. Third, in addition to visualizing the pattern (preimage), it is also essential to understand the relevant features that define the process variation pattern. This dissertation considers these variation challenges. A base kernel principal component analysis …

Contributors
Sahu, Anshuman, Runger, George C., Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2013

Creative design lies at the intersection of novelty and technical feasibility. These objectives can be achieved through cycles of divergence (idea generation) and convergence (idea evaluation) in conceptual design. The focus of this thesis is on the latter aspect. The evaluation may involve any aspect of technical feasibility and may be desired at component, sub-system or full system level. Two issues that are considered in this work are: 1. Information about design ideas is incomplete, informal and sketchy 2. Designers often work at multiple levels; different aspects or subsystems may be at different levels of abstraction Thus, high fidelity analysis …

Contributors
Khorshidi, Maryam, Shah, Jami J, Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2014