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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Technology advancements in diagnostic imaging, smart sensing, and health information systems have resulted in a data-rich environment in health care, which offers a great opportunity for Precision Medicine. The objective of my research is to develop data fusion and system informatics approaches for quality and performance improvement of health care. In my dissertation, I focus on three emerging problems in health care and develop novel statistical models and machine learning algorithms to tackle these problems from diagnosis to care to system-level decision-making. The first topic is diagnosis/subtyping of migraine to customize effective treatment to different subtypes of patients. Existing clinical …

Contributors
Si, Bing, Li, Jing, Montgomery, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2018

Healthcare operations have enjoyed reduced costs, improved patient safety, and innovation in healthcare policy over a huge variety of applications by tackling prob- lems via the creation and optimization of descriptive mathematical models to guide decision-making. Despite these accomplishments, models are stylized representations of real-world applications, reliant on accurate estimations from historical data to jus- tify their underlying assumptions. To protect against unreliable estimations which can adversely affect the decisions generated from applications dependent on fully- realized models, techniques that are robust against misspecications are utilized while still making use of incoming data for learning. Hence, new robust techniques are …

Contributors
Bren, Austin, Saghafian, Soroush, Mirchandani, Pitu, et al.
Created Date
2018

Understanding customer preference is crucial for new product planning and marketing decisions. This thesis explores how historical data can be leveraged to understand and predict customer preference. This thesis presents a decision support framework that provides a holistic view on customer preference by following a two-phase procedure. Phase-1 uses cluster analysis to create product profiles based on which customer profiles are derived. Phase-2 then delves deep into each of the customer profiles and investigates causality behind their preference using Bayesian networks. This thesis illustrates the working of the framework using the case of Intel Corporation, world’s largest semiconductor manufacturing company. …

Contributors
Ram, Sudarshan Venkat, Kempf, Karl G, Wu, Teresa, et al.
Created Date
2017

Buildings consume nearly 50% of the total energy in the United States, which drives the need to develop high-fidelity models for building energy systems. Extensive methods and techniques have been developed, studied, and applied to building energy simulation and forecasting, while most of work have focused on developing dedicated modeling approach for generic buildings. In this study, an integrated computationally efficient and high-fidelity building energy modeling framework is proposed, with the concentration on developing a generalized modeling approach for various types of buildings. First, a number of data-driven simulation models are reviewed and assessed on various types of computationally expensive …

Contributors
Cui, Can, Wu, Teresa, Weir, Jeffery D., et al.
Created Date
2016