Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Date Range
2010 2019


The recent proposal of two-way relaying has attracted much attention due to its promising features for many practical scenarios. Hereby, two users communicate simultaneously in both directions to exchange their messages with the help of a relay node. This doctoral study investigates various aspects of two-way relaying. Specifically, the issue of asynchronism, lack of channel knowledge, transmission of correlated sources and multi-way relaying techniques involving multiple users are explored. With the motivation of developing enabling techniques for two-way relay (TWR) channels experiencing excessive synchronization errors, two conceptually-different schemes are proposed to accommodate any relative misalignment between the signals received at …

Contributors
Salim, Ahmad Suhail, Duman, Tolga M, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2015

Fundamental limits of fixed-to-variable (F-V) and variable-to-fixed (V-F) length universal source coding at short blocklengths is characterized. For F-V length coding, the Type Size (TS) code has previously been shown to be optimal up to the third-order rate for universal compression of all memoryless sources over finite alphabets. The TS code assigns sequences ordered based on their type class sizes to binary strings ordered lexicographically. Universal F-V coding problem for the class of first-order stationary, irreducible and aperiodic Markov sources is first considered. Third-order coding rate of the TS code for the Markov class is derived. A converse on the …

Contributors
Iri, Nematollah, Kosut, Oliver, Bliss, Daniel, et al.
Created Date
2018

The phrase water-energy nexus is commonly used to describe the inherent and critical interdependencies between the electric power system and the water supply systems (WSS). The key interdependencies between the two systems are the power plant’s requirement of water for the cooling cycle and the water system’s need of electricity for pumping for water supply. While previous work has considered the dependency of WSS on the electrical power, this work incorporates into an optimization-simulation framework, consideration of the impact of short and long-term limited availability of water and/or electrical energy. This research focuses on the water supply system (WSS) facet …

Contributors
Khatavkar, Puneet Nandkumar, Mays, Larry W, Vittal, Vijay, et al.
Created Date
2019

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts. The first part studies socially-aware mobile networking and computing. First, it studies random access control and power control under a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework. The socially-aware Nash equilibria (SNEs) are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies mobile crowdsensing under an incentive mechanism that exploits social trust assisted reciprocity (STAR). The efficacy of …

Contributors
Gong, Xiaowen, Zhang, Junshan, Cochran, Douglas, et al.
Created Date
2015