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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Objective of this thesis project is to build a prototype using Linear Temporal Logic specifications for generating a 2D motion plan commanding an iRobot to fulfill the specifications. This thesis project was created for Cyber Physical Systems Lab in Arizona State University. The end product of this thesis is creation of a software solution which can be used in the academia and industry for research in cyber physical systems related applications. The major features of the project are: creating a modular system for motion planning, use of Robot Operating System (ROS), use of triangulation for environment decomposition and using stargazer …

Contributors
Pandya, Parth Ashwinkumar, Fainekos, Georgios, Dasgupta, Partha, et al.
Created Date
2013

As the number of cores per chip increases, maintaining cache coherence becomes prohibitive for both power and performance. Non Coherent Cache (NCC) architectures do away with hardware-based cache coherence, but they become difficult to program. Some existing architectures provide a middle ground by providing some shared memory in the hardware. Specifically, the 48-core Intel Single-chip Cloud Computer (SCC) provides some off-chip (DRAM) shared memory some on-chip (SRAM) shared memory. We call such architectures Hybrid Shared Memory, or HSM, manycore architectures. However, how to efficiently execute multi-threaded programs on HSM architectures is an open problem. To be able to execute a …

Contributors
Rawat, Tushar Shishpal, Shrivastava, Aviral, Dasgupta, Partha, et al.
Created Date
2014