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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Over the last decade, deep neural networks also known as deep learning, combined with large databases and specialized hardware for computation, have made major strides in important areas such as computer vision, computational imaging and natural language processing. However, such frameworks currently suffer from some drawbacks. For example, it is generally not clear how the architectures are to be designed for different applications, or how the neural networks behave under different input perturbations and it is not easy to make the internal representations and parameters more interpretable. In this dissertation, I propose building constraints into feature maps, parameters and and …

Contributors
Lohit, Suhas Anand, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2019

Generating real-world content for VR is challenging in terms of capturing and processing at high resolution and high frame-rates. The content needs to represent a truly immersive experience, where the user can look around in 360-degree view and perceive the depth of the scene. The existing solutions only capture and offload the compute load to the server. But offloading large amounts of raw camera feeds takes longer latencies and poses difficulties for real-time applications. By capturing and computing on the edge, we can closely integrate the systems and optimize for low latency. However, moving the traditional stitching algorithms to battery …

Contributors
Gunnam, Sridhar, LiKamWa, Robert, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2018

The detection and segmentation of objects appearing in a natural scene, often referred to as Object Detection, has gained a lot of interest in the computer vision field. Although most existing object detectors aim to detect all the objects in a given scene, it is important to evaluate whether these methods are capable of detecting the salient objects in the scene when constraining the number of proposals that can be generated due to constraints on timing or computations during execution. Salient objects are objects that tend to be more fixated by human subjects. The detection of salient objects is important …

Contributors
Kotamraju, Sai Prajwal, Karam, Lina J, Yu, Hongbin, et al.
Created Date
2019

Disentangling latent spaces is an important research direction in the interpretability of unsupervised machine learning. Several recent works using deep learning are very effective at producing disentangled representations. However, in the unsupervised setting, there is no way to pre-specify which part of the latent space captures specific factors of variations. While this is generally a hard problem because of the non-existence of analytical expressions to capture these variations, there are certain factors like geometric transforms that can be expressed analytically. Furthermore, in existing frameworks, the disentangled values are also not interpretable. The focus of this work is to disentangle these …

Contributors
Koneripalli, Kaushik, Turaga, Pavan, Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia, et al.
Created Date
2019