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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


Contributor
Language
  • English
Date Range
2011 2019


Several music players have evolved in multi-dimensional and surround sound systems. The audio players are implemented as software applications for different audio hardware systems. Digital formats and wireless networks allow for audio content to be readily accessible on smart networked devices. Therefore, different audio output platforms ranging from multispeaker high-end surround systems to single unit Bluetooth speakers have been developed. A large body of research has been carried out in audio processing, beamforming, sound fields etc. and new formats are developed to create realistic audio experiences. An emerging trend is seen towards high definition AV systems, virtual reality gears as …

Contributors
Dharmadhikari, Chinmay Nrusinha, Spanias, Andreas, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2016

The ability to identify unoccupied resources in the radio spectrum is a key capability for opportunistic users in a cognitive radio environment. This paper draws upon and extends geometrically based ideas in statistical signal processing to develop estimators for the rank and the occupied subspace in a multi-user environment from multiple temporal samples of the signal received at a single antenna. These estimators enable identification of resources, such as the orthogonal complement of the occupied subspace, that may be exploitable by an opportunistic user. This concept is supported by simulations showing the estimation of the number of users in a …

Contributors
Beaudet, Kaitlyn, Cochran, Douglas, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Video denoising has been an important task in many multimedia and computer vision applications. Recent developments in the matrix completion theory and emergence of new numerical methods which can efficiently solve the matrix completion problem have paved the way for exploration of new techniques for some classical image processing tasks. Recent literature shows that many computer vision and image processing problems can be solved by using the matrix completion theory. This thesis explores the application of matrix completion in video denoising. A state-of-the-art video denoising algorithm in which the denoising task is modeled as a matrix completion problem is chosen …

Contributors
Maguluri, Hima Bindu, Li, Baoxin, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2013

Recent advances in camera architectures and associated mathematical representations now enable compressive acquisition of images and videos at low data-rates. While most computer vision applications of today are composed of conventional cameras, which collect a large amount redundant data and power hungry embedded systems, which compress the collected data for further processing, compressive cameras offer the advantage of direct acquisition of data in compressed domain and hence readily promise to find applicability in computer vision, particularly in environments hampered by limited communication bandwidths. However, despite the significant progress in theory and methods of compressive sensing, little headway has been made …

Contributors
Kulkarni, Kuldeep Sharad, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2012

Fisheye cameras are special cameras that have a much larger field of view compared to conventional cameras. The large field of view comes at a price of non-linear distortions introduced near the boundaries of the images captured by such cameras. Despite this drawback, they are being used increasingly in many applications of computer vision, robotics, reconnaissance, astrophotography, surveillance and automotive applications. The images captured from such cameras can be corrected for their distortion if the cameras are calibrated and the distortion function is determined. Calibration also allows fisheye cameras to be used in tasks involving metric scene measurement, metric scene …

Contributors
Kashyap Takmul Purushothama Raju, Vinay, Karam, Lina, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2014

There has been tremendous technological advancement in the past two decades. Faster computers and improved sensing devices have broadened the research scope in computer vision. With these developments, the task of assessing the quality of human actions, is considered an important problem that needs to be tackled. Movement quality assessment finds wide range of application in motor control, health-care, rehabilitation and physical therapy. Home-based interactive physical therapy requires the ability to monitor, inform and assess the quality of everyday movements. Obtaining labeled data from trained therapists/experts is the main limitation, since it is both expensive and time consuming. Motivated by …

Contributors
Som, Anirudh, Turaga, Pavan, Krishnamurthi, Narayanan, et al.
Created Date
2016

Continuous monitoring of sensor data from smart phones to identify human activities and gestures, puts a heavy load on the smart phone's power consumption. In this research study, the non-Euclidean geometry of the rich sensor data obtained from the user's smart phone is utilized to perform compressive analysis and efficient classification of human activities by employing machine learning techniques. We are interested in the generalization of classical tools for signal approximation to newer spaces, such as rotation data, which is best studied in a non-Euclidean setting, and its application to activity analysis. Attributing to the non-linear nature of the rotation …

Contributors
Sivakumar, Aswin, Turaga, Pavan, Spanias, Andreas, et al.
Created Date
2014

In this thesis we consider the problem of facial expression recognition (FER) from video sequences. Our method is based on subspace representations and Grassmann manifold based learning. We use Local Binary Pattern (LBP) at the frame level for representing the facial features. Next we develop a model to represent the video sequence in a lower dimensional expression subspace and also as a linear dynamical system using Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) model. As these subspaces lie on Grassmann space, we use Grassmann manifold based learning techniques such as kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis with Grassmann kernels for classification. We consider six expressions …

Contributors
Yellamraju, Anirudh, Chakrabarti, Chaitali, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2014

Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and …

Contributors
Simhadri, Sravanthi, Zhou, Yi, Turaga, Pavan, et al.
Created Date
2014

With robots being used extensively in various areas, a certain degree of robot autonomy has always been found desirable. In applications like planetary exploration, autonomous path planning and navigation are considered essential. But every now and then, a need to modify the robot's operation arises, a need for a human to provide it some supervisory parameters that modify the degree of autonomy or allocate extra tasks to the robot. In this regard, this thesis presents an approach to include a provision to accept and incorporate such human inputs and modify the navigation functions of the robot accordingly. Concepts such as …

Contributors
Vemprala, Sai Hemachandra, Saripalli, Srikanth, Fainekos, Georgios, et al.
Created Date
2013