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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The drive towards device scaling and large output power in millimeter and sub-millimeter wave power amplifiers results in a highly non-linear, out-of-equilibrium charge transport regime. Particle-based Full Band Monte Carlo device simulators allow an accurate description of this carrier dynamics at the nanoscale. This work initially compares GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on the established Ga-face technology and the emerging N-face technology, through a modeling approach that allows a fair comparison, indicating that the N-face devices exhibit improved performance with respect to Ga-face ones due to the natural back-barrier confinement that mitigates short-channel-effects. An investigation is then carried …

Contributors
Guerra, Diego, Saraniti, Marco, Saraniti, Marco, et al.
Created Date
2011

Semiconductor nanowires are important candidates for highly scaled three dimensional electronic devices. It is very advantageous to combine their scaling capability with the high yield of planar CMOS technology by integrating nanowire devices into planar circuits. The purpose of this research is to identify the challenges associated with the fabrication of vertically oriented Si and Ge nanowire diodes and modeling their electrical behavior so that they can be utilized to create unique three dimensional architectures that can boost the scaling of electronic devices into the next generation. In this study, vertical Ge and Si nanowire Schottky diodes have been fabricated …

Contributors
Chandra, Nishant, Goodnick, Stephen M, Tracy, Clarence J, et al.
Created Date
2014

In mesoscopic physics, conductance fluctuations are a quantum interference phenomenon that comes from the phase interference of electron wave functions scattered by the impurity disorder. During the past few decades, conductance fluctuations have been studied in various materials including metals, semiconductors and graphene. Since the patterns of conductance fluctuations is related to the distributions and configurations of the impurity scatterers, each sample has its unique pattern of fluctuations, which is considered as a sample fingerprint. Thus, research on conductance fluctuations attracts attention worldwide for its importance in both fundamental physics and potential technical applications. Since early experimental measurements of conductance …

Contributors
Liu, Bobo, Ferry, David K, Akis, Richard, et al.
Created Date
2015

In this work, transport in nanowire materials and nanowire field effect transistors is studied using a full band Monte Carlo simulator within the tight binding basis. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the importance of nanowires and nanoscale devices in present day electronics and the necessity to use a computationally efficient tool to simulate transport in these devices. Chapter 2 discusses the calculation of the full band structure of nanowires based on an atomistic tight binding approach, particularly noting the use of the exact same tight binding parameters for bulk band structures as well as the nanowire band structures. Chapter 3 …

Contributors
Hathwar, Raghuraj, Goodnick, Stephen M, Goodnick, Stephen M, et al.
Created Date
2016