Skip to main content

ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.




Genomic structural variation (SV) is defined as gross alterations in the genome broadly classified as insertions/duplications, deletions inversions and translocations. DNA sequencing ushered structural variant discovery beyond laboratory detection techniques to high resolution informatics approaches. Bioinformatics tools for computational discovery of SVs however are still missing variants in the complex cancer genome. This study aimed to define genomic context leading to tool failure and design novel algorithm addressing this context. Methods: The study tested the widely held but unproven hypothesis that tools fail to detect variants which lie in repeat regions. Publicly available 1000-Genomes dataset with experimentally validated variants was …

Contributors
Shetty, Sheetal Vittal, Dinu, Valentin, Bussey, Kimberly, et al.
Created Date
2014

The processes of a human somatic cell are very complex with various genetic mechanisms governing its fate. Such cells undergo various genetic mutations, which translate to the genetic aberrations that we see in cancer. There are more than 100 types of cancer, each having many more subtypes with aberrations being unique to each. In the past two decades, the widespread application of high-throughput genomic technologies, such as micro-arrays and next-generation sequencing, has led to the revelation of many such aberrations. Known types and subtypes can be readily identified using gene-expression profiling and more importantly, high-throughput genomic datasets have helped identify …

Contributors
Yellapantula, Venkata Divya Teja, Dinu, Valentin, Scotch, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2014

No two cancers are alike. Cancer is a dynamic and heterogeneous disease, such heterogeneity arise among patients with the same cancer type, among cancer cells within the same individual’s tumor and even among cells within the same sub-clone over time. The recent application of next-generation sequencing and precision medicine techniques is the driving force to uncover the complexity of cancer and the best clinical practice. The core concept of precision medicine is to move away from crowd-based, best-for-most treatment and take individual variability into account when optimizing the prevention and treatment strategies. Next-generation sequencing is the method to sift through …

Contributors
Peng, Sen, Dinu, Valentin, Scotch, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2015

Social media is becoming increasingly popular as a platform for sharing personal health-related information. This information can be utilized for public health monitoring tasks such as pharmacovigilance via the use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques. One of the critical steps in information extraction pipelines is Named Entity Recognition (NER), where the mentions of entities such as diseases are located in text and their entity type are identified. However, the language in social media is highly informal, and user-expressed health-related concepts are often non-technical, descriptive, and challenging to extract. There has been limited progress in addressing these challenges, and advanced …

Contributors
Nikfarjam, Azadeh, Gonzalez, Graciela, Greenes, Robert, et al.
Created Date
2016

Accounting for over a third of all emerging and re-emerging infections, viruses represent a major public health threat, which researchers and epidemiologists across the world have been attempting to contain for decades. Recently, genomics-based surveillance of viruses through methods such as virus phylogeography has grown into a popular tool for infectious disease monitoring. When conducting such surveillance studies, researchers need to manually retrieve geographic metadata denoting the location of infected host (LOIH) of viruses from public sequence databases such as GenBank and any publication related to their study. The large volume of semi-structured and unstructured information that must be reviewed …

Contributors
Tahsin, Tasnia, Gonzalez, Graciela, Scotch, Matthew, et al.
Created Date
2019

Unstructured texts containing biomedical information from sources such as electronic health records, scientific literature, discussion forums, and social media offer an opportunity to extract information for a wide range of applications in biomedical informatics. Building scalable and efficient pipelines for natural language processing and extraction of biomedical information plays an important role in the implementation and adoption of applications in areas such as public health. Advancements in machine learning and deep learning techniques have enabled rapid development of such pipelines. This dissertation presents entity extraction pipelines for two public health applications: virus phylogeography and pharmacovigilance. For virus phylogeography, geographical locations …

Contributors
Magge, Arjun, Scotch, Matthew, Gonzalez-Hernandez, Graciela, et al.
Created Date
2019