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ASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations


This collection includes most of the ASU Theses and Dissertations from 2011 to present. ASU Theses and Dissertations are available in downloadable PDF format; however, a small percentage of items are under embargo. Information about the dissertations/theses includes degree information, committee members, an abstract, supporting data or media.

In addition to the electronic theses found in the ASU Digital Repository, ASU Theses and Dissertations can be found in the ASU Library Catalog.

Dissertations and Theses granted by Arizona State University are archived and made available through a joint effort of the ASU Graduate College and the ASU Libraries. For more information or questions about this collection contact or visit the Digital Repository ETD Library Guide or contact the ASU Graduate College at gradformat@asu.edu.


The focus of this dissertation is first on understanding the difficulties involved in constructing reduced order models of structures that exhibit a strong nonlinearity/strongly nonlinear events such as snap-through, buckling (local or global), mode switching, symmetry breaking. Next, based on this understanding, it is desired to modify/extend the current Nonlinear Reduced Order Modeling (NLROM) methodology, basis selection and/or identification methodology, to obtain reliable reduced order models of these structures. Focusing on these goals, the work carried out addressed more specifically the following issues: i) optimization of the basis to capture at best the response in the smallest number of modes, …

Contributors
Lin, Jinshan, Mignolet, Marc, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2020

This investigation develops small-size reduced order models (ROMs) that provide an accurate prediction of the response of only part of a structure, referred to as component-centric ROMs. Four strategies to construct such ROMs are presented, the first two of which are based on the Craig-Bampton Method and start with a set of modes for the component of interest (the β component). The response in the rest of the structure (the α component) induced by these modes is then determined and optimally represented by applying a Proper Orthogonal Decomposition strategy using Singular Value Decomposition. These first two methods are effectively basis …

Contributors
Wang, Yuting, Mignolet, Marc P, Jiang, Hanqing, et al.
Created Date
2017

Finite element simulations modeling the hydrodynamic impact loads subjected to an elastomeric coating were performed to develop an understanding of the performance and failure mechanisms of protective coatings for cavitating environments. In this work, two major accomplishments were achieved: 1) scaling laws were developed from hydrodynamic principles and numerical simulations to allow conversion of measured distributions of pressure peaks in a cavitating flow to distributions of microscopic impact loadings modeling individual bubble collapse events, and 2) a finite strain, thermo-mechanical material model for polyurea-based elastomers was developed using a logarithmic rate formulation and implemented into an explicit finite element code. …

Contributors
Liao, Xiao, Oswald, Jay, Liu, Yongming, et al.
Created Date
2016

The focus of this investigation is on the optimum placement of a limited number of dampers, fewer than the number of blades, on a bladed disk to induce the smallest amplitude of blade response. The optimization process considers the presence of random mistuning, i.e. small involuntary variations in blade stiffness properties resulting, say, from manufacturing variability. Designed variations of these properties, known as intentional mistuning, is considered as an option to reduce blade response and the pattern of two blade types (A and B blades) is then part of the optimization in addition to the location of dampers on the …

Contributors
Murthy, Raghavendra Narasimha, Mignolet, Marc P, Rajan, Subramaniam, et al.
Created Date
2012

Gels are three-dimensional polymer networks with entrapped solvent (water etc.). They bear amazing features such as stimuli-responsive (temperature, PH, electric field etc.), high water content and biocompatibility and thus find a lot of applications. To understand the complex physics behind gel's swelling phenomenon, it is important to build up fundamental mechanical model and extend to complicated cases. In this dissertation, a coupled large deformation and diffusion model regarding gel's swelling behavior is presented. In this model, free-energy of the total gel is constituted by polymer stretching energy and polymer-solvent mixing energy. In-house nonlinear finite element code is implemented with fast …

Contributors
Zhang, Jiaping, Jiang, Hanqing, Peralta, Pedro, et al.
Created Date
2012